Speech by the Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator, Knut Ostby at the 73rd UN Day Commemoration in Nay Pyi Taw

Your Excellency State Counsellor Daw Aung San Suu Kyi,

Dignitaries,

Distinguished Guests,

Colleagues,

Ladies and Gentlemen,

 

First allow me to express my appreciation to Her Excellency Daw Aung San Suu Kyi for her gracious remarks on the annual celebration of the UN Day.

The United Nations and Myanmar have a shared past and a common future.
Our partnership dates back 70 years as Myanmar joined the UN a few months after she gained her independence in 1948.

Since then, Myanmar has played an active role in the work of the UN, and the UN also has remained actively engaged in supporting the development of Myanmar.

Notably, Myanmar gave the UN its son, U Thant,  to lead the organization as Secretary-General    from 1961 to 1971.

He helped to turn the UN into what it is today.

For example, it was under U Thant’s leadership that UNDP, as it is today, was founded in the mid 1960s.

 Similarly, he introduced the daily noon briefing for the press at UN Headquarters, improving its transparency, access to information and accountability — allowing media to do their job.

In terms of our presence in Myanmar, the UN opened its first office in 1957.

While the cooperation between the successive governments had its rise and fall, both the UN and Myanmar knew that its ties were unbreakable. This cooperation began to broaden in the aftermath of Cyclone Nargis in 2008.

Our partnership deepened and expanded after the country began its political transitions in 2011 and restrictions on UN mandates were lifted in 2012.

Today, we have a team of 2,400 mostly national colleagues working in more than 60 offices in all states and regions.

 The work of the UN in Myanmar is guided by the Sustainable Development Goals, which have been adopted worldwide as critical milestones for progress.

 We are pleased to see that the Myanmar Sustainable Development Plan is closely aligned with this set of goals.

We delivered nearly US$ 300 million in 2017 in the following four focus areas:

1. Maintaining the momentum for the transitions:

In the spirit of collaboration, we support the transitions that the government of Myanmar is undertaking: from conflict to peace, the democratic transition, and the transformation from a closed to an open economy.

Some examples of our support include:

UNDP’s Civil Service Reform Strategic Action Plan aims to improve service delivery, reduce corruption and enhance inclusion in the civil service.
Together with the Government of Myanmar, UNICEF, UNHCR, ILO and Office of the Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator have supported the release of over 900 under age soldiers by Tatmadaw.

UNODC helped the Government to launch a new drug policy.

UNOPS-managed programs have been supporting 56 financial institutions that collectively reach 2.1 million clients.

UNICEF, WHO and GAVI helped the Government vaccinate 13.5 million children against Japanese Encephalitis.

FAO is developing guidelines for cattle production and trade to benefit smallholders throughout the country.

 UNFPA has provided support towards the Myanmar Population and Housing Census which has become an indispensable tool for policy makers.

The UN also provided funding and technical assistance to the Joint Ceasefire Monitoring Committee, including support to the launch of its five State/Region and two Local offices.

 Save lives now:

Our goal is to ensure that all people in need can get humanitarian aid.
To reach our goal, we need humanitarian access.

While we have achieved increased access in some areas, people in need still cannot be reached in parts of Kachin, Shan and Rakhine States.

Nevertheless, we continue to deliver on our humanitarian mandate.

Last year, OCHA coordinated aid operations reaching over 240,000 displaced people who remain in camps or camp-like situations in Kachin, Shan and Rakhine.

WFP delivered life-saving and life-changing food assistance to over 1 million displaced, conflict-affected and vulnerable people in 14 states and regions.

We will continue to advocate for free, timely, safe and unimpeded access in cooperation with the Special Envoy and other partners.

  1. Sustainable solutions for Rakhine, Kachin and Shan:

 As the State Counsellor said in Singapore on resolution of the Rakhine crisis, “Our approach has to be holistic and inclusive.”

 In line with that, we have prepared with partners a Strategic Framework for International Engagement in Rakhine State, so that our contribution is effective, efficient and impactful.

 We initiated work under the Memorandum of Understanding between the Government, UNDP and UNHCR – in support of creating conditions for the safe, dignified and voluntary return to places of origin or choosing.

The crisis in Rakhine is a result of decades of human rights violations and restrictions of movement, identity and political rights.

Accountability must be part of the solution, as well as freedom of movement, access to services, pathway to citizenship and development benefiting all people, irrespective of ethnicity, religion or citizenship status.

 As next steps, we are engaging the Government to promote sustainable solutions for the IDPs and implementation of the Rakhine Advisory Commission’s recommendations.

 Seven UN agencies launched projects under a US$ 20 million grant from Japan to prepare the ground for creating enabling and sustainable grounds for the resolution of challenges faced in Rakhine.

We are aware of the challenges in other parts of Myanmar. Towards this end, we have started to prepare a Strategic Framework for International Engagement in Kachin and Shan.

 More broadly, the UN is committed to the success of the peace process, and is open to exploring innovative ways to support it going forward. 

  1. Human rights agenda and advocacy:


As you know, UN is founded on the principles of human rights and all our work is guided by them.

 We are preparing a new UN human rights strategy and continue with our work on Human Rights Up Front to ensure that each of our activities promotes human rights.

We will continue to work with the Government to fulfill its obligations under international treaties and encourage cooperation with all human rights mechanisms.

Currently, an OHCHR mission is in Myanmar to help move forward the human rights agenda, including the OHCHR-UNDP capacity needs assessment of the National Human Rights Commission.

In addition, we also give priority to prevention of sexual harassment and exploitation within our operations.Allow me to assure you that national priorities and addressing the needs of all people are central to all our work.

We build on 70 years of partnership anchored in the pillars of UN’s work – peace, development and human rights.
Our success is measured in Myanmar’s progress.

 We are ready to do more – to collaborate on achieving the Sustainable Development Goals: ending poverty, leaving no one behind and ensuring human rights for all.


Allow me to turn now to Secretary-General’s message for the 2018 UN Day:

United Nations Day marks the birthday of our founding Charter – the landmark document that embodies the hopes, dreams and aspirations of “we the peoples”.

Every day, the women and men of the United Nations work to give practical meaning to that Charter.

Despite the odds and the obstacles, we never give up.

Extreme poverty is being reduced but we see inequality growing.

Yet we don’t give up because we know by reducing inequality we increase hope and opportunity and peace around the world.

Climate change is moving faster than we are, but we don’t give up because we know that climate action is the only path.

Human rights are being violated in so many places. But we don’t give up because we know respect for human rights and human dignity is a basic condition for peace.

Conflicts are multiplying – people are suffering. But we don’t give up because we know every man, woman and child deserves a life of peace.

On United Nations Day, let us reaffirm our commitment.

To repair broken trust.

To heal our planet.

To leave no one behind.

To uphold dignity for one and all, as united nations.


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This concluded the message from the Secretary-General.

Allow me to reiterate our commitment to supporting Myanmar in its transitions, humanitarian operations, development and human rights agenda.

Thank you for your attention.

ကုလသမဂၢအေထြေထြအတြင္းေရးမွဴးခ်ဳပ္၏ ျမန္မာႏိုင္ငံဆိုင္ရာ အထူးကိုယ္စားလွယ္၏ ခရီးစဥ္ႏွင့္စပ္လ်ဥ္းသည့္ ထုတ္ျပန္ေၾကညာခ်က္

ကုလသမဂၢအေထြေထြအတြင္းေရးမွဴးခ်ဳပ္၏ ျမန္မာႏိုင္ငံဆိုင္ရာ အထူးကိုယ္စားလွယ္၏ ခရီးစဥ္ႏွင့္စပ္လ်ဥ္းသည့္ ထုတ္ျပန္ေၾကညာခ်က္

ကုလသမဂၢအေထြေထြအတြင္းေရးမွဴးခ်ဳပ္၏ အထူးကိုယ္စားလွယ္ မစၥခရစၥတင္းရွရန္နာဘာဂန္နာသည္ ျမန္မာႏိုင္ငံသို႔ တတိယအႀကိမ္ ခရီးစဥ္အား ေအာက္တိုဘာလ ၁၀ ရက္မွ ၂၀ ရက္အထိ လာေရာက္ခဲ့ပါသည္။ ဤခရီးစဥ္တြင္ သူမသည္ ႏိုင္ငံေတာ္၏ အတိုင္ပင္ခံပုဂၢိဳလ္ ေဒၚေအာင္ဆန္းစုၾကည္၊ အျခားအစိုးရႏွင့္ တပ္မေတာ္ ေခါင္းေဆာင္မ်ား၊ တိုင္းရင္းသားလက္နက္ကိုင္အဖဲြ႕အစည္းမ်ား၊ NGO မ်ား၊ UN အဖဲြ႕အစည္းမ်ား၊  သံတမန္အသိုက္အဝန္းမ်ားႏွင့္ ေတြ႕ဆံုေဆြးေႏြးခဲ့ပါသည္။

“တာဝန္ခံမႈသည္ အမ်ိဳးသားျပန္လည္သင့္ျမတ္ေရးအတြက္ အေရးႀကီးေသာ မ႑ိဳင္ႏွစ္ရပ္အနက္ တခု ျဖစ္ၿပီး ေနာက္ထပ္မ႑ိဳင္တစ္ရပ္မွာ အားလံုးပါဝင္ႏိုင္ေသာ ေဆြးေႏြးဖလွယ္မႈျဖစ္ေၾကာင္း၊ ယံုၾကည္စိတ္ခ်ရေသာ အခ်က္အလက္ရွာေဖြမႈသည္ တာဝန္ခံမႈအတြက္ ပထမေျခလွမ္းျဖစ္ပါေၾကာင္း” သူမက အႀကိမ္ႀကိမ္ ေျပာၾကားခဲ့ပါသည္။

ရခိုင္ျပည္နယ္ႏွင့္ကခ်င္ျပည္နယ္တြင္လည္း သူမသည္ ေဒသခံအရပ္ဘက္ႏွင့္စစ္ဘက္ဆိုင္ရာ အာဏာပိုင္မ်ားႏွင့္ ေတြ႕ဆံုခဲ့သလို ထိခိုက္နစ္နာခဲ့သူမ်ား၊ အထူးသျဖင့္ အမ်ိဳးသမီးမ်ားႏွင့္ တိုက္ရိုက္ ေတြ႕ဆံုေဆြးေႏြးခဲ့ပါသည္။

ရခိုင္ျပည္နယ္သို႔ ဇြန္လအတြင္း ပထမအႀကိမ္ လာေရာက္ခဲ့ခ်ိန္မွစ၍ ရရွိလာေသာ တိုးတက္မႈမ်ားကို ခန္႔မွန္းသိရွိ္ႏိုင္ရန္အတြက္ အထူးကိုယ္စားလွယ္သည္ ေက်ာက္ေတာ္၊ ဘူးသီးေတာင္၊ ေမာင္ေတာႏွင့္ စစ္ေတြရွိ IDP စခန္းအခ်ိဳ႕ႏွင့္ IDP မ်ားအား ျပန္လည္ေနရာခ်ထားေပးသည့္ ေနရာအခ်ိဳ႕သို႔ သြားေရာက္ခဲ့ပါသည္။  ျမန္မာႏိုင္ငံအစိုးရ၊ UNHCR ႏွင့္ UNDP တို႔ၾကားေရးထိုးထားသည့္ MoU အား အေကာင္အထည္ ေဖာ္မႈမ်ားကို စတင္ေနၿပီျဖစ္ေၾကာင္း သိရွိနားလည္သျဖင့္ ရခိုင္ျပည္နယ္ ေျမာက္ပိုင္းႏွင့္ အလယ္ပိုင္းရွိ ေနရာမ်ားအားလံုးသို႔ လြတ္လပ္စြာ သြားေရာက္ခြင့္ျပဳရန္ႏွင့္ ေလ့လာဆန္းစစ္မႈမ်ား ျပဳလုပ္ရန္ အေရးတႀကီးလိုအပ္ေၾကာင္းကို သူမက အေလးေပးေျပာၾကားခဲ့ပါသည္။

IDP စခန္းမ်ားတြင္ ပညာေရးဆိုင္ရာ အေထာက္အပံ့မ်ား ပိုမိုေပးအပ္ႏိုင္ရန္ ႀကိဳးပမ္းလုပ္ေဆာင္ထား မႈမ်ားကို သူမေတြ႕ရွိခဲ့ရၿပီး အတူတကြ ပညာသင္ၾကားႏိုင္မည့္ အခြင့္အလမ္းမ်ား ပိုမိုရရွိလာေရးအတြက္ ဆက္လက္ပံ့ပိုး ေပးရန္ မိတ္ဖက္မ်ားအား တိုက္တြန္းအားေပးခဲ့ပါသည္။ ထို႔ျပင္ ရခိုင္ျပည္နယ္အၾကံေပးေကာ္မရွင္၏ အၾကံျပဳခ်က္မ်ားႏွင့္အညီ ေနရပ္စြန္႕ခြာေရႊ႕ေျပာင္းေနထိုင္ရမႈမ်ား အဆံုးသတ္ေစရန္အတြက္ ဂုဏ္သိကၡာရွိစြာျဖင့္ ေရရွည္ရွင္သန္ရပ္တည္ႏိုင္ေရး နည္းလမ္းမ်ားကို ရွာေဖြၾကဖို႔ လိုေၾကာင္းကိုလည္း သူမကေျပာၾကားခဲ့ပါသည္။

“IDP စခန္းမ်ား ပိတ္သိမ္းရံုႏွင့္ မလံုေလာက္ေသးေၾကာင္း၊ ပညာေရး၊ က်န္းမာေရး၊ လြတ္လပ္စြာ သြားလာခြင့္တို႔မွစ၍ IDP မ်ား၏ လူ႕အခြင့္အေရးအျပည့္အဝကို ေလးစားရန္ လိုအပ္ေၾကာင္း၊ ၎တို႔သည္ ေဘးကင္း၍ လံုျခံဳစြာ ေနထိုင္ႏိုင္ရမည္ျဖစ္ေၾကာင္း၊ ယင္းသည္ ဘဂၤလားေဒ့ရွ္ရွိ ဒုကၡသည္မ်ား ျပန္လာေအာင္ ဆြဲေဆာင္အားေပးႏိုင္ဆံုးအရာ ျဖစ္လိမ့္မည္ ျဖစ္ေၾကာင္း၊ ၎တို႔ ျပန္လာမည့္ ေနရာေဒသမ်ားတြင္ UN ႏွင့္ UN ၏ မိတ္ဖက္မ်ား ရွိေနေၾကာင္း သိရွိလွ်င္ ေနရပ္ျပန္သူမ်ားအေနျဖင့္ ျပန္လည္လက္ခံေရးလုပ္ငန္းစဥ္အေပၚတြင္ ယံုၾကည္မႈ၊ စိတ္ခ်မႈ ရုရွေစမွာျဖစ္ေၾကာင္း” သူမက ေျပာၾကားခဲ့ပါသည္။ အားလံုးပါဝင္ႏိုင္ေသာ ဖံြ႕ၿဖိဳးတိုးတက္မႈကို အေရးတႀကီး လိုအပ္ေနသည့္ ျမန္မာႏိုင္ငံ၏ ဆင္းရဲႏြမ္းပါးဆံုး ေဒသတစ္ခုျဖစ္ေသာ ရခိုင္ျပည္နယ္တြင္ ျပည္တြင္းျပည္ပရင္းႏွီးျမႇဳပ္ႏွံမႈမ်ား  လိုအပ္ေနေၾကာင္းကိုလည္း သူမက အေလးထားေျပာၾကားခဲ့ပါသည္။

ကခ်င္ျပည္နယ္တြင္လည္း အထူးကိုယ္စားလွယ္သည္ ျမစ္ႀကီးနားၿမိဳ႕အနီးဝန္းက်င္ရွိ ဒုကၡသည္စခန္းမ်ား၌ ေနထိုင္ၾကေသာ ေနရပ္စြန္႕ခြာေရႊ႕ေျပာင္းသူမ်ားႏွင့္ ေတြ႕ဆံုခဲ့ပါသည္။ ထိုစခန္းမ်ားတြင္ ေနထိုင္ေနသူအခ်ိဳ႕သည္ ၂၀၁၁ခုႏွစ္ကတည္းက ၎တို႔၏ မူရင္းေနရပ္ေဒသမ်ားကို စြန္႕ခြာလာခဲ့ရသူမ်ားျဖစ္ၿပီး ေျမျမႇဳပ္မိုင္းမ်ားႏွင့္ လံုျခံဳေရး အေျခအေနေၾကာင့္ အလုပ္အကိုင္ရရွိႏိုင္သည့္ အလားအလာ သုိ႔မဟုတ္ မိမိတို႔၏ ေနရပ္သို႔ ျပန္သြားရန္ ေမွ်ာ္လင့္ခ်က္ မရွိၾကသူမ်ား ျဖစ္ပါသည္။ ျပည္တြင္းေနရပ္စြန္႕ခြာေရႊ႕ေျပာင္းသူမ်ားထံ သြားေရာက္ရန္ ပို၍၊ ပို၍ ခက္ခဲလာမႈေၾကာင့္ ႏိုင္ငံတကာ အသိုင္းအဝိုင္းႏွင့္ ျပည္တြင္းအဖဲြ႕အစည္းမ်ားမွ ေပးအပ္ေသာ က်န္းမာေရး ေစာင့္ေရွာက္မႈ အကူအညီမ်ား ႏွင့္ ေထာက္ပံ့ပစၥည္းမ်ားကို ေနရပ္စြန္႕ခြာေရႊ႕ေျပာင္းသူမ်ားအေနျဖင့္ လက္လွမ္းမီရရွိႏိုင္ရန္ ခက္ခဲလာသည္ကိုလည္း သူမ သတိျပဳမိခဲ့ပါသည္။ ထိုအေၾကာင္းေၾကာင့္ အထူးကိုယ္စားလွယ္က ထိခိုက္နစ္နာခဲ့ရေသာ အရပ္သားမ်ား၊ အထူးသျဖင့္ အမ်ိဳးသမီးမ်ားႏွင့္ ကေလးမ်ားအတြက္ အက်ိဳးျဖစ္ထြန္းမည့္ နည္းလမ္းမ်ားကို ရွာေဖြၾကရန္ သက္ဆိုင္သည့္ ဆက္စပ္ပတ္သက္သူမ်ားအားလံုးကို တိုက္တြန္းပါသည္။ “ေနာက္ဆံုးတြင္ ၿငိမ္းခ်မ္းေရးႏွင့္ စစ္မွန္ေသာ ႏိုင္ငံေရးေဆြးေႏြးပဲြကသာလွ်င္ အဆိုပါျပႆနာမ်ားကို ေျဖရွင္းႏိုင္မည္ျဖစ္ေၾကာင္း” သူမက ဆိုပါသည္။

၂၀၁၅ခုႏွစ္၊ ေအာက္တိုဘာလ ၁၅ ရက္တြင္ လက္မွတ္ေရးထိုးခဲ့သည့္ တစ္ႏိုင္ငံလံုးပစ္ခတ္တိုက္ခတ္မႈ ရပ္စဲေရး သေဘာတူညီခ်က္ (NCA) လက္မွတ္ေရးထိုးသည့္ သံုးႏွစ္ေျမာက္ႏွစ္ပတ္လည္အခမ္းအနား၌ ႏိုင္ငံ၏ ေျမာက္ပိုင္းေဒသမ်ားတြင္ တိုက္ပဲြမ်ား ျပန္လည္ျပင္းထန္လာသည္ႏွင့္စပ္လ်ဥ္း၍ စိုးရိမ္ပူပန္ေၾကာင္း သူမက ေျပာၾကားခဲ့ပါသည္။ NCA လက္မွတ္ ေရးထိုးထားေသာ တိုင္းရင္းသားလက္နက္ကိုင္အဖဲြ႕အစည္းမ်ားႏွင့္ အလြတ္ သေဘာ ေဆြးေႏြးညိႇႏိႈင္းမႈမ်ားကို ဆံုးျဖတ္ခ်က္ခ်မွတ္သည့္အဆင့္တြင္ စတင္လုပ္ေဆာင္ႏိုင္ေအာင္ အစိုးရ၏ ႀကိဳးပမ္းအားထုတ္မႈမ်ားကို သူမက အသိအမွတ္ျပဳခဲ့ပါသည္။ အထူးကိုယ္စားလွယ္က ဆက္စပ္ပတ္သက္သူမ်ား အားလံုးၾကား စိတ္ရွည္မႈႏွင့္ ပိုမိုအားေကာင္းေသာ ယံုၾကည္မႈကို တည္ေဆာက္ရန္ လိုအပ္ေၾကာင္းလည္း အထူး အေလးထားေျပာၾကားသြားၿပီး သူမအေနျဖင့္ ေပါင္းကူးတံတားတစ္ခုသဖြယ္ ေဆာင္ရြက္ေပးလိုပါေၾကာင္း ကမ္းလွမ္းခဲ့ပါသည္။ သူမက ၿငိမ္းခ်မ္းေရးလုပ္ငန္းစဥ္တြင္ ျပည္တြင္းျဖစ္ နည္းလမ္းစစ္စစ္ကို ရွာေဖြေဖာ္ထုတ္ ႏိုင္ရန္အတြက္ အားလံုးပါဝင္ႏိုင္မႈ ပိုမိုရရွိေအာင္ ေဆာင္ရြက္ၾကရန္ တိုက္တြန္းခဲ့ၿပီး သူမအေနျဖင့္လည္း တစ္တပ္ တစ္အား ပါဝင္ကူညီႏိုင္ရန္အတြက္ ဆက္စပ္ပတ္သက္သူအားလံုးႏွင့္ နီးကပ္စြာ ဆက္သြယ္ညိႇႏိႈင္းေဆြးေႏြးေပးဖို႔ အဆင္သင့္ရွိေၾကာင္း ေျပာၾကားခဲ့ပါသည္။

အထူးကိုယ္စားလွယ္သည္ စာနယ္ဇင္းလြတ္လပ္ခြင့္ႏွင့္ တရားဥပေဒစိုးမိုးေရး အပါအဝင္ ျမန္မာႏိုင္ငံ၏ ဒီမိုကေရစီ ကူးေျပာင္းမႈအေပၚ အျမင္မ်ား ဖလွယ္ခဲ့ပါသည္။ အခ်ိန္ယူေဆာင္ရြက္ရမည့္ ၿငိမ္းခ်မ္းစြာအတူယွဥ္တြဲေနထိုင္ေရး အတြက္ သူမက ျပည္ေထာင္စုအစိုးရအား “ခဲြျခားဆက္ဆံမႈကို လံုးဝလက္သင့္မခံ” သည့္ လူထုလႈပ္ရွားမႈတစ္ခုကို အျမင့္ဆုံးအဆင့္တြင္ ေဆာင္ရြက္ရန္ တိုက္တြန္းခဲ့ပါသည္။ ျမန္မာအာဏာပိုင္မ်ားအေနျဖင့္ သူမႏွင့္ နီးကပ္စြာ ညိႇႏိႈင္းေဆြးေႏြးေဆာင္ရြက္သြားရန္ စိတ္ဆႏၵရွိမႈအေပၚအသိအမွတ္ျပဳပါသည္။ မတူကြဲျပားမႈအား တန္ဖိုးရွိေသာ အရာတစ္ခုအျဖစ္ အသိအမွတ္ျပဳေသာ၊ ပိုိုမိုသေဘာထားႀကီးၿပီး၊ ဒီမုိကေရစီနည္းက်၍ အားလံုးပါဝင္ႏိုင္သည့္ လူမႈအဖဲြ႕အစည္းတစ္ခု ေပၚထြန္းလာေရး အတြက္ အထူးကုိယ္စားလွယ္အေနျဖင့္ ျမန္မာႏိုင္ငံႏွင့္ ႏိုင္ငံတကာ အသိုင္းအဝိုင္းၾကား ထိေတြ႕ဆက္ဆံမႈ မ်ား ပိုမိုအားေကာင္းလာေစရန္း  ဆက္လက္ႀကိဳးပမ္း အားထုတ္ေပးသြားမည္ ျဖစ္ပါသည္။

ရန္ကုန္၊ ၂၀၁၈ခုႏွစ္၊ ေအာက္တုိဘာလ ၂၀ ရက္

 

 

Statement Attributable to the Secretary-General’s Special Envoy on Myanmar

Statement Attributable to the Secretary-General’s Special Envoy on Myanmar

The Special Envoy of the Secretary-General (SESG), Christine Schraner Burgener, undertook her third visit to Myanmar from 10 to 20 October where she held consultations with State Counsellor Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, other government and military leaders, ethnic armed organizations, local and religious leaders, NGOs, UN agencies and the diplomatic community. “Accountability is one of two important pillars for national reconciliation, the other is inclusive dialogue,” she said repeatedly. “Credible fact-finding is the first step towards accountability.” In Rakhine and Kachin states, the SESG also engaged with local civilian and military authorities, and directly with the affected populations, in particular women.

In Rakhine state, the SESG went to several IDP camps and relocation sites in Kyauktaw, Buthidaung, Maungdaw and Sittwe, to gauge progress made since her first visit in June. Noting that the implementation of the MoU between Myanmar, UNHCR and UNDP had begun, she stressed the urgent need for complete access and assessment throughout northern and central Rakhine. She saw that efforts had been made to provide more learning facilities in IDP camps and encouraged counterparts to continue providing greater access on joint education opportunities. The SESG also underlined the need for dignified and durable solutions to end displacement in line with the recommendations of the Advisory Commission. “Closing the IDP camps is not enough. The IDPs full human rights need to be respected: starting with equal access to education and health, and freedom of movement. They have to be able to live in safety and security. This will be the most positive incentive for the refugees in Bangladesh to return. Knowing that the UN and its partners are present at their places of return, will give the returnees confidence and trust in the process.” She also emphasized the need for greater domestic and foreign investment in the region, one of Myanmar’s poorest which urgently requires inclusive development.

In Kachin state, the SESG also engaged with IDPs in camps around Myitkyina, some of whom have been displaced since 2011 without job prospects or hope of returning to their places of origin, due to land-mines and lack of security. She took note of the increasingly limited humanitarian access which affected the availability of medical assistance and aid. The SESG encouraged all stakeholders concerned to find constructive solutions for the benefit of the suffering civilians, especially the women and children. “Ultimately, only peace and a genuine political dialogue can address these problems.”

On the occasion of the third anniversary of the signing of Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement, the SESG expressed her deep concern about the intensified fighting in the North. She acknowledged the efforts made by the Government to start informal negotiations at the decision-making level with the signatory ethnic armed organisations. The SESG stressed the need for patience and more trust-building and offered to serve as a bridge. She called for greater inclusiveness and underlined her readiness to engage closely with all stakeholders in helping advance the peace process towards a homegrown solution.

The SESG exchanged views on Myanmar’s democratic transition, including on freedom of the press and rule of law. In order to further peaceful co-existence, which needs time, she urged the Union government to undertake a public “Zero Tolerance for Discrimination” campaign at the highest level. Appreciating the willingness of the Myanmar authorities to engage with her closely, she will continue to focus her efforts on strengthening engagement between Myanmar and the international community towards a more tolerant, democratic and inclusive society that recognizes diversity as an asset.

Yangon, 20 October 2018

###

 

New Infographics by the Independent Fact Finding Mission on Myanmar released.

Infographics of the Independent Fact Finding Mission on Myanmar are available at the following links.
ျမန္မာႏိုင္ငံဆိုင္ရာလြတ္လပ္ေသာအခ်က္အလက္ရွာေဖြေရးမစ္ရွင္၏ website တြင္ infographics မ်ားကိုထပ္မံတင္ဆက္ထားပါသည္။ ေ အာက္ပါ link မ်ားတြင္၀င္ေရာက္ၾကည့္ရႈႏုိင္သည္။

THE SECRETARY-GENERAL — REMARKS TO THE ASEAN LEADERS’ GATHERING

THE SECRETARY-GENERAL

REMARKS TO THE ASEAN LEADERS’ GATHERING

 

Denpasar, 11 October 2018

 

[as delivered]

 

President Widodo, thank you very much for your invitation and warm hospitality.

 

I want to begin by expressing once again my deepest condolences and solidarity with all those affected by the terrible earthquake and tsunami in Sulawesi and my admiration for the effective, very effective response led by the Indonesian Government.

 

Mr. President, we are with you and with the people of Indonesia. 

 

I will be travelling to Palu tomorrow.  I want to reiterate the full commitment of the United Nations to support government-led rescue and relief efforts. 

 

I also commend the work of the ASEAN Coordinating Centre for Humanitarian Assistance which has been instrumental in the response, even embedding some of our UN staff.   

Excellencies,

 

I thank you for your focus today on sustainable development. 

 

As we discussed together in New York last month, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is our common roadmap to an inclusive, resilient and secure future for everyone, everywhere.

 

It is a solid foundation for building a fair globalization in the context of the rules-based multilateral system. 

 

But we have much work ahead of us.  Our world is simply not going far enough and fast enough to realize the Sustainable Development Goals.

 

Major threats stand out as huge obstacles to eradicating poverty, expanding opportunity and leaving no one behind.

 

In ASEAN, you have made important progress over the past half century – becoming more and more a global economic powerhouse.

 

Since the year 2000, extreme poverty has been halved in this region.

 

We have seen great strides in reducing child and maternal mortality and ensuring gender parity in education. 

 

Still, ASEAN is far from immune to global megatrends brought on by challenges such as climate change, rising inequality, urbanisation and the impacts of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, not to mention recent trade tensions.

 

Today, I would like to stress two areas of particular concern to me: inequality and climate change. 

 

First, the inequality challenge. 

 

I salute your effort to ‘narrow the development gap’ between and within ASEAN Member-States.

 

To tackle inequalities, we must take on a broad range of strategies to eradicate poverty and ensure inclusive development.  That means improving access to quality education and health care.  It means reforming the tax system, making it more equitable and able to maximize revenues for sustainable development investments.  It means enhanced access to labour markets, strong social protection schemes and harnessing the rich diversity and demographic dividend of ASEAN youth. 

 

Simultaneously, gender equality and women’s empowerment are essential.

 

As you address the inequality challenge, I want to recognize ongoing comprehensive efforts such as the ‘Initiative for ASEAN Integration’.

 

Excellencies,

 

The second critical area I want to focus on, is climate change.

 

ASEAN knows this only too well.  Four ASEAN Member States – Myanmar, the Philippines, Thailand, and Viet Nam – are among the world’s top ten countries most affected by climate change. 

 

I reiterate our strong commitment to the ASEAN-UN Action Plan on Environment and Climate Change.

 

This week’s IPCC report makes clear that climate change is running faster than we are – and we are running out of time. 

 

But it is not too late.  We can limit temperature rise to 1.5 degrees.  We have many of the technologies we need – and every effort counts.  Bending the emissions curve by 2020 – and limiting temperature rise by even a half degree can make a world of difference. 

 

But that will require urgent and far more ambitious action.

 

The report urges unprecedented changes in all aspects of society to cut emissions by half by 2030 and reach net zero emissions by 2050 – especially in key sectors such as land, energy, industry, buildings, transport and cities.

 

Specifically, we need to end deforestation and plant billions of trees; drastically reduce the use of fossil fuels and phase out coal by 2050; ramp up installation of wind and solar power; invest in climate-friendly sustainable agriculture; and consider new technologies such as carbon capture and storage. 

 

All this requires a surge in investments in mitigation and adaptation.

 

The next key moment is the December twenty-fourth session of the Conference of the Parties (COP24) in Katowice, Poland.  We must do everything in our power to make it a success.

 

I urge you to do all you can to resolve the sticking points and make sure the world leaves Katowice with critically important implementation guidelines for operationalizing the Paris Agreement.  This is a must.  And I count on ASEAN’s leadership.

 

We have another vital opportunity at the UN Climate Summit which I will convene in September 2019. 

 

The Summit will take place one year before countries have to enhance their national climate pledges under the Paris Agreement.  It will be an opportunity for leaders and partners to showcase their ambition.

 

I look forward to seeing you all there. 

 

Excellencies,

 

There are clear interlinkages, as it was said, between the ASEAN’s Vision 2025 and the UN 2030 Agenda.

 

The ‘complementarities initiative’ has ensured a solid framework to advance our work together on these regional priorities.

 

The UN is also committed to support the ASEAN Centre for Sustainable Development Studies and Dialogue, which can serve as a leading regional platform for capacity building and South-South cooperation.

 

Excellencies,

 

Recent progress on peace and security issues in the ASEAN region is a hopeful sign, and we look forward to building on our cooperation in this field.

 

Last year, ASEAN Leaders issued a Joint Statement on Promoting Women, Peace and Security.

 

This shared commitment recognized the importance of women’s leadership and participation to build peaceful and inclusive societies, as reflected in the 2030 Agenda.

 

This is a personal priority and I commit the UN to working hand-in-hand with ASEAN to strengthen women’s leadership for peace and security. 

 

Over the last 50 years, ASEAN has gained a wealth of rich experiences in prevention, peace-making and peace-building from which the international community can take a lot of profit.

 

I am also encouraged that the ASEAN Institute for Peace and Reconciliation is emerging as a regional platform on conflict prevention – and welcome recent joint human rights initiatives on business, environment and media freedom.

 

I recognize ASEAN’s efforts to address the humanitarian and human rights crisis in Myanmar’s Rakhine State – and to encourage and support creating the conditions necessary for the safe, voluntary and dignified return of the refugees. 

 

This requires a massive investment – not only in reconstruction and development, but also in reconciliation and respect for people’s rights. 

 

It will be important to guarantee the full implementation of the recommendations in the report by the Advisory Commission on Rakhine State, which was led by the late Kofi Annan.

 

Excellencies,

 

Once again thank you for your focus on the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development — our common agenda for people, planet, prosperity, peace and partnership.

 

I am here as your partner and your friend. 

 

You can count on my total commitment to work with you and the people of the ASEAN region to strengthen our collaboration, to transform promises into action and to ensure that no-one is left behind.

 

Thank you very much Mr. President.

 

Address by H.E. Mr. António Guterres , Secretary-General, at the 73rd Session of the UN General Assembly

Secretary-General of the United Nations

H.E. Mr. António Guterres , Secretary-General

25 September 2018

Statement Summary:

ANTÓNIO GUTERRES, Secretary-General of the United Nations, said the world is suffering from a bad case of “trust deficit disorder”, with people losing faith in political establishments amid rising polarization and populism.  Cooperation among States is more difficult, divisions within the Security Council stark, and trust in global governance fragile as twenty-first century challenges outpace twentieth century institutions and mindsets.  While living standards for millions have improved, and a third world war avoided, that cannot be taken for granted.  “Multilateralism is under fire precisely when we need it most,” he said.  While a multipolar world will not in itself guarantee peace or solve global problems, shifts in the balance of power may increase the risk of confrontation, he cautioned.  Leaders have the duty to advance the well-being of their people, but as guardians of the common good, they also have a duty to promote and support a reformed, reinvigorated and strengthened multilateral system.

Leaders must renew their commitment to a rules-based order, with the United Nations at its centre and with the different institutions and treaties that bring the United Nations Charter to life, he stated.  They must also demonstrate the added value of international cooperation by delivering peace, defending human rights and driving economic and social progress for women and men everywhere.  “In the face of massive existential threats to people and planet — but, equally, at a time of compelling opportunities for shared prosperity — there is no way forward but collective, common-sense action for the common good,” he underscored.  “This is how we rebuild trust.”

Recalling the seven challenges he set out in his address to the General Debate at the opening of the seventy-second session a year ago, he noted that, sadly, they remain unresolved.  He cited, among other things, wars in Syria and Yemen, the situation of the Rohingya people, the Israel-Palestinian conflict, nuclear peril, the use of chemical weapons, trade tensions, discrimination against refugees and migrants, and growing authoritarianism as the human rights agenda loses ground.  It is the common duty of all to reverse those trends and move ahead on the basis of facts, not fear, with prevention at the heart of all efforts.

Focusing on climate change, which represents a direct existential threat, he stressed:  “we have reached a pivotal moment.  If we do not change course in the next two years, we risk runaway climate change.”  World leaders must listen to scientists, see what is happening before their very eyes and guarantee implementation of the Paris Agreement.  Voicing concern about insufficient progress at the Bangkok negotiations on implementation guidelines, he said the upcoming Conference of the Parties must be a success.  The good news is that technology is on the side of progress, with the potential to create jobs and contribute to the global economy.  The real danger is the risk of failing to act.  Governments must end fossil fuel subsidies and establish fair prices for carbon.  “Our future is at stake.  Climate change affects everything,” he said, announcing that he will convene a summit on climate change in September 2019 to mobilize action and financing one year before States are to revive their Paris pledges.  Only a higher level of ambition will do, he said, adding:  “The world needs you to be climate champions.”

While new technologies hold great promise, they also pose risks and serious dangers, including criminal activity and disruption to labour markets, he continued.  Malicious acts in cyberspace, such as disinformation campaigns, are polarizing communities and diminishing trust among States.  Social media and the digital revolution are reinforcing tribalism and reinforcing a male-dominated culture.  The technology sector must become more diverse, not least for its own benefit.  With technology outpacing institutions, cooperation between States and stakeholders is crucial, he said, stressing the urgency to find and implement mutually beneficial solutions to digital challenges.  Further, the dangers of new technologies on warfare also need to be urgently addressed, particularly now that the prospect of weapons which can select and attack targets on their own could trigger a new arms race.  “Let’s call it as it is:  the prospect of machines with the discretion and power to take human life is morally repugnant,” he said, warning that any new war could include a massive cyberattack against civilian infrastructure as well as military capacities.  He urged the international community to use the United Nations as a platform to nurture a digital future that is safe and beneficial for all.

Despite chaos and confusion in the world, there are winds of hope, he said, citing peace initiatives between Eritrea and neighbouring States, the signing of a peace agreement between the rival leaders of South Sudan, and summit meetings between the leaders of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea and the United States and Republic of Korea.  He also cited a strong commitment to peace in Colombia, steps taken by Greece and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia to resolve their differences, and peaceful political transitions in Armenia, Liberia and Uzbekistan.  Approval of compacts on refugees and migrations is another sign of hope, while the drive for gender equality is gaining ground.  “Our future rests on solidarity,” he said.  “We must repair broken trust.  We must reinvigorate our multilateral project and we must uphold dignity for one and all.”


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Previous Sessions

Press Conference for Asia-Based Press –  Publication of Full Report of the Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar and Presentation to the Human Rights Council


14 September 2018
                      Press Conference for Asia-Based Press

Publication of Full Report of the Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar and Presentation to the Human Rights Council

Wednesday, 19 September 2018
Room III, Palais de Nations

10:00 – 11:00 (CEST)

Live streaming at webtv.un.org

Questions to the experts can be submitted
via WhatsApp +41 (0) 766 910 799. An effort will be made to translate Myanmar language questions. Please note that responses will be given in English.

Speakers

  • Marzuki Darusman, Chairperson, Independent International Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar
  • Radhika Coomaraswamy, Member of the Independent International Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar
  • Christopher Sidoti, Member of the Independent International Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar

Read the official report here. The long report will be available at the same address on 18th September.

Contact:  Nathan Thompson, Media Advisor to IIFFMM
consultant.thompson@ohchr.org  +41 (0) 766 910 799

 

 

Press Release by the UN Independent International Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar.

GENEVA (10th September 2018) – Today, the UN Independent International Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar have released their report on human rights violations and abuses committed in Kachin, Shan and Rakhine States in Myanmar Language.

 The report is 47 pages long and found patterns of gross human rights violations that “undoubtedly amount to the gravest crimes under international law”, principally by Myanmar’s military, the Tatmadaw, but also by other security forces.

 Please find the translated report here.

 Contact information: Nathan Thompson, +41 76 691 0799 consultant.thompson@ohchr.org

Myanmar Version

 ကုလသမဂၢ လြတ္လပ္ေသာ ႏိုင္ငံတကာ အခ်က္အလက္ရွာေဖြေရးမစ္ရွင္ ၏သတင္းထုတ္ျပန္ခ်က္။

ဂ်ီနီဗာၿမိဳ႕၊ (၂၀၁၈) ခုႏွစ္၊ စက္တင္ဘာလ (၁၀) ရက္။

ကုလသမဂၢ လြတ္လပ္ေသာ ႏိုင္ငံတကာ အခ်က္အလက္ရွာေဖြေရးမစ္ရွင္သည္ ကခ်င္၊ ရွမ္းႏွင့္ ရခိုင္ျပည္နယ္တို႔တြင္ က်ဴးလြန္ခဲ့ၾကေသာ လူ႔အခြင့္အေရးခ်ဳိးေဖာက္မႈမ်ားႏွင့္ မတရားျပဳမႈမ်ားကို မွတ္တမ္းတင္သည့္ ျမန္မာႏိုင္ငံဆိုင္ရာ အစီရင္ခံစာကို ထုတ္ျပန္လိုက္သည္။  ယင္းအစီရင္ခံစာကို ယေန႔မွစ၍ ျမန္မာဘာသာျဖင့္ ဖတ္ရွဳႏိုင္ၿပီျဖစ္သည္။

ထိုအစီရင္ခံစာတြင္ စာမ်က္ႏွာ (၄၇) မ်က္ႏွာပါရွိၿပီး၊ အျပည္ျပည္ဆို္င္ရာဥပေဒအရ အဆိုးရြားဆံုး ရာဇဝတ္မႈမ်ား က်ိန္းေသသက္ေရာက္ၿပီး၊ အလြန္ဆိုးရြားေသာ လူ႔အခြင့္အေရး ခ်ဳိးေဖာက္မႈပံုစံမ်ားကို ျမန္မာ့တပ္မေတာ္မွ အဓိက က်ဴးလြန္ၿပီး၊ တျခားလံုၿခံဳေရးတပ္ဖြဲ႕မ်ားပါ က်ဴးလြန္ခဲ့ေၾကာင္း ေတြ႕ရွိခဲ့သည္။

ျမန္မာဘာသာျဖင့္ ျပန္ထားေသာ အစီရင္ခံစာကို ဤေနရာတြင္ ဖတ္ရွဳႏိုင္ပါသည္။

ဆက္သြယ္ရန္   –     ေနသန္တြမ္မဆမ္ (Nathan Thompson)

အီးေမးလိပ္စာ   –     consultant.thompson@ohchr.org

 

 

UN experts condemn sentencing of Reuters journalists

UN experts condemn sentencing of Reuters journalists

GENEVA (3 September 2018) – UN experts strongly condemned today’s sentencing of two Reuters journalists to seven years imprisonment.

Journalists Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo were sentenced to seven years imprisonment on 3 September by a court in Yangon for breaching a law on state secrets, following their reporting on Rakhine State.

“The sentencing of Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo is a dark moment for Myanmar,” said David Kaye, Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression, and Yanghee LeeSpecial Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Myanmar.

“This is yet another clear signal of Myanmar’s distancing from international human rights law. We regret that the court failed to recognise the importance of independent journalism, freedom of expression and the public’s right to know.

“We urge the President to pardon the journalists, and if the case is appealed, for the court to take into account Myanmar’s human rights obligations and order their release,” the experts said.

The Special Rapporteurs previously have expressed their grave concerns, and urged greater press freedom after the journalists’ detention.

ENDS

 *The UN experts: Ms. Yanghee Lee, Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Myanmarand Mr. David KayeSpecial Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression

 The Special Rapporteurs are part of what is known as the Special Procedures of the Human Rights Council. Special Procedures, the largest body of independent experts in the UN Human Rights system, is the general name of the Council’s independent fact-finding and monitoring mechanisms that address either specific country situations or thematic issues in all parts of the world. Special Procedures’ experts work on a voluntary basis; they are not UN staff and do not receive a salary for their work. They are independent from any government or organization and serve in their individual capacity.

 For more information and media requests please contact:

Ms. Marina Narvaez (+41-22917 9615/mnarvaez@ohchr.org) or Ms. Azin Tadjdini (+41 22 917 9400 / atadjdini@ohchr.org) or write to freedex@ohchr.org.

 For media inquiries related to other UN independent experts:
Jeremy Laurence, UN Human Rights – Media Unit (+ 41 22 917 9383 / 
jlaurence@ohchr.org

 This year is the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopted by the UN on 10 December 1948. The Universal Declaration – translated into a world record 500 languages – is rooted in the principle that “all human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights.” It remains relevant to everyone, every day. In honour of the 70th anniversary of this extraordinarily influential document, and to prevent its vital principles from being eroded, we are urging people everywhere to Stand Up for Human Rightswww.standup4humanrights.org

Statement attributable to the Spokesman for the Secretary-General on Myanmar

Statement attributable to the Spokesman for the Secretary-General on Myanmar

The Secretary-General takes note with concern of the conviction and sentencing today in Myanmar of journalists Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo to seven years of imprisonment. He urges the authorities to review their decision.

The right to freedom of expression and information is a cornerstone of any democracy. It is unacceptable that these journalists were prosecuted for reporting on major human rights violations against the Rohingya in Rakhine State.

The Secretary-General will continue to advocate for the release of the journalists. He calls for full respect of freedom of the press and all human rights in Myanmar.

Stephane Dujarric, Spokesman for the Secretary-General

New York, 3 September 2018

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