Author Archives: Aye Win

Statement of the Office of the UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator in Myanmar

Statement of the Office of the UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator in Myanmar

11 October 2017

The UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator Renata Lok-Dessallien announced today that she will be completing her assignment after nearly four years in Myanmar.

The Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator will use her remaining time until the end of the month to further the UN system’s efforts to promote peace and security, human rights, as well as humanitarian and development assistance for all people in Myanmar. She will continue to urge for the end of violence in the northern townships of Rakhine State, to allow full access for humanitarian aid, and to ensure the safe, dignified and sustainable return of refugees and IDPs to their places of origin.

The Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator expresses her gratitude to the Government and the people of Myanmar for the opportunity to serve in the country. She thanks her UN colleagues and partners for their exceptional commitment to promoting UN principles. She also appreciates the Secretary-General’s confidence in the UN team in Myanmar.

The departure of the Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator is a part of a succession process announced in the spring of this year. Renata Lok-Dessallien will be taking on another assignment at headquarters.

Media contact: Stanislav Saling, the Office of the UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator in Myanmar, stanislav.saling@one.un.org or +95-942 651 9871

 

Statement following government-organized visit to northern Rakhine

Statement following government-organized visit to northern Rakhine

2 October 2017

The UN appreciates the Government of Myanmar’s invitation to participate in the visit to northern Rakhine organized by national authorities for diplomatic community and the UN.

This was a positive step and such visits, under appropriate conditions, could help in our efforts to explore potential areas where the UN could cooperate with the Myanmar authorities in alleviating the dire situation in northern Rakhine.

Three UN representatives participated in the field visit — the UN Resident Coordinator Ms. Renata Lok-Dessallien; the WFP representative and Deputy Humanitarian Coordinator, Mr. Domenico Scalpelli, and senior UNHCR official Ms. Cécile Fradot.

The scale of human suffering is unimaginable and the UN extends its deepest condolences to all those affected.

The UN advocates for the end to the cycle of violence and for establishing law and order and the rule of law; to allow unfettered access for humanitarian support; and to ensure the safe, voluntary, dignified and sustainable return of the refugees to their areas of origin.

The UN used the field visit also to send a signal of hope to the people in the affected areas, as well as to connect with its staff in northern Rakhine.

The UN delegation reiterated the need for a greater access for humanitarian and human rights actors to conduct comprehensive assessments of the situation on the ground in order to address the concerns and needs of all communities in affected areas. The UN called also for access for the media.

Building on this visit, the UN looks forward to strengthening trust and cooperation with all communities and the Myanmar Government. This will be critical in addressing the root causes and setting a sustainable path towards peace and prosperity of all people in Rakhine State, irrespective of ethnicity, religion or citizenship status.

The UN stands ready to provide its full support to the authorities in responding to the humanitarian and human rights crisis in northern Rakhine, as well as the implementation of the recommendations of the Advisory Commission on Rakhine State.

Contact Stanislav Saling from the Office of the UN Resident Coordinator in Myanmar for more information at stanislav.saling@one.un.org or +95-942 651 9871.

 

NOTE TO CORRESPONDENTS ON MYANMAR

 

NOTE TO CORRESPONDENTS ON MYANMAR

The United Nations strongly disagrees with allegations against the UN Resident Coordinator in Myanmar, Renata Lok-Dessallien. The Secretary-General has full confidence in the Resident Coordinator and her Team.

The UN has consistently and strongly focused on protection of human rights and inclusive development on behalf of all the people of Myanmar, irrespective of ethnicity, religion or citizenship status. The Resident Coordinator has been a tireless advocate for human rights, conflict prevention, and humanitarian and development assistance in Rakhine State. She has drawn attention to rights abuses and called for credible investigations; advocated against incitement to violence; and supported efforts to promote inter-communal harmony. The UN in Myanmar, led by the Resident Coordinator, works with a wide array of government and non-government partners to help enhance Myanmar’s capacities to tackle root causes of conflict, to strengthen democratic institutions, to expand access to justice and to reduce poverty. Human rights stand at the center of everything the UN does, and this includes the rollout of the Human Right Up Front by her team.

In the Secretary-General’s address to the Security Council yesterday, he called on the Myanmar authorities to take three immediate steps: to end the military operations; to allow unfettered access for humanitarian support; and to ensure the safe, voluntary, dignified and sustainable return of the refugees to their areas of origin.

Stephane Dujarric, Spokesman for the Secretary-General

29 September 2017

THE SECRETARY-GENERAL — REMARKS AT OPEN DEBATE OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL ON MYANMAR

THE SECRETARY-GENERAL


REMARKS AT OPEN DEBATE OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL
ON MYANMAR
New York, 28 September 2017

[as delivered]

I welcome this opportunity to brief you on the crisis in Myanmar.

On September 2nd, I wrote to this Council urging concerted efforts to prevent further escalation of the crisis in northern Rakhine state.

I am encouraged that the Council has discussed the situation four times in less than a month.

The reality on the ground demands action — swift action — to protect people, alleviate suffering, prevent further instability, address the root causes of the situation and forge, at long last, a durable solution.

The following briefing is based on our reporting from the ground, and is our best sense of what has happened, what is still happening, and what needs to be done.

The current crisis has steadily deteriorated since the August 25 attacks by the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army on the Myanmar security forces.  I repeat my condemnation of those attacks today.

Since then, the situation has spiralled into the world’s fastest developing refugee emergency and a humanitarian and human rights nightmare.

I continue to call on the Myanmar authorities to take three immediate steps:

First, to end the military operations;

Second, to allow unfettered access for humanitarian support;

And third, to ensure the safe, voluntary, dignified and sustainable return of the refugees to their areas of origin.

Let me now review what we know about the military operations that have taken place since August 25th.
While there have been competing narratives in a highly complex environment, certain elements are clear.

At least 500,000 civilians have fled their homes and sought safety in Bangladesh.

Although the total number of those displaced is unknown, it is estimated that 94 per cent of them are Rohingya.

The devastating humanitarian situation is not only a breeding ground for radicalization, it also puts vulnerable people – including young children –
at risk of criminal elements including trafficking.

We have received bone-chilling accounts from those who fled — mainly women, children and the elderly.

These testimonies point to excessive violence and serious violations of human rights, including indiscriminate firing of weapons, the presence of landmines and sexual violence.

This is unacceptable and must end immediately.

International human rights law and standards are clear:  any use of force by the authorities must respect Myanmar’s human rights obligations under international law and comply with well-established human rights standards.  Above all, these actions must fully respect the human rights of those affected, regardless of ethnicity or religion.

The use of lethal force, even in situations of emergency, must be commensurate with the threat to the public order and utmost care must be taken to minimize loss of life and injury, especially for unarmed people and communities.

The authorities have claimed that security operations ended on September 5th, following major displacements in northern Rakhine, where Rohingya were the majority.

However, displacement appears to have continued, with reports of the burning of Muslim villages, as well as looting and acts of intimidation.

Myanmar authorities themselves have indicated that at least 176 of 471 Muslim villages in northern Rakhine have been totally abandoned.

In Rathedaung Township, three quarters of the Rohingya population has fled.  Most villages and all three of the former internally displaced persons camps have been burnt to the ground.  Just five isolated Muslim communities remain in Rathedaung.

Elsewhere too, a majority of the abandoned villages were majority Muslim.

There seems to be a deeply disturbing pattern to the violence and ensuing large movements of an ethnic group from their homes.

The failure to address this systematic violence could result in a spill-over into central Rakhine, where an additional 250,000 Muslims could potentially face displacement.  They are outnumbered by Rakhine communities, some of whom have engaged in violent acts of vigilantism against their Muslim neighbours.

The violence in Rakhine – whether by the military or radical elements within communities – must end.

The Myanmar authorities must fulfil their fundamental obligation of ensuring the safety and security of all communities and upholding the rule of law without discrimination.

Let me now turn to the question of humanitarian access.

It is imperative that UN agencies and our non-governmental partners be granted immediate and safe access to all affected communities.

I am deeply concerned by the current climate of antagonism towards the United Nations and non-governmental organizations.  Indeed, this can lead to unacceptable violence, such as the recent attacks against the ICRC by Rakhine villagers in Sittwe.

The Myanmar authorities have said repeatedly in the past few days that “it was not the time”
for unhindered access to resume.

Given the enormous needs, this position is deeply regrettable.  The United Nations and its partners should be allowed to reach the affected areas without delay.

I would also like to address the issue of safe return of refugees to their places of origin.

I ask members of the Security Council to join me in urging that all those who have fled to Bangladesh be able to exercise their right to a safe, voluntary, dignified and sustainable return to their homes.

Myanmar authorities have committed to use the framework established in the 1993 Joint Statement of the Foreign Ministers of Bangladesh and Myanmar to facilitate these returns.

While that may be a useful starting point, it is not sufficient in the present circumstances.
Notably, the framework does not refer to resolving the root cause of displacement.  Moreover, it requires documents that the fleeing Rohingya may not be able to provide.

The United Nations is committed to a plan for voluntary return and calls upon the international community to support such an effort.  This should include development assistance to the villages of those who return home, and the implementation of the Rakhine Advisory Commission recommendations regarding verification and citizenship.

Voluntary repatriation also requires, as a critical first step, the registration of refugees in Bangladesh using internationally accepted standards.

The United Nations is ready to support Myanmar and Bangladesh in all stages of this important process.

Ensuring the safe, voluntary and dignified return of refugees to Rakhine – in line with international refugee law – will require the restoration of mutual trust among the communities.

Improving inter-communal relations is a critical part of a sustainable resolution to the crisis and one of the essential recommendations of the Rakhine Advisory Commission, led by Kofi Annan.

In this highly complex environment, the Myanmar authorities must work to defuse tensions and uphold and protect the rights of all communities, including respect for property rights.

Those who fled should be able to return to their homes in peace – not to yet another cycle of violence.

It will be especially important to avoid re-locating those displaced yet again to camp-like conditions.

In Bangladesh, the United Nations continues to step up our humanitarian response.

The High Commissioner for Refugees visited just days ago.

In the next two weeks, the World Food Programme, the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, the International Organization for Migration and UNICEF will visit the Bangladesh border area.

On October 9th, UNHCR, OCHA and IOM will convene a donor’s conference.

In my meeting last week with Bangladesh Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina, I expressed great appreciation for the care being provided to refugees.  I commend those countries that are supporting Bangladesh in its response.

Let me also stress the need for strengthened cooperation between Myanmar and Bangladesh and I welcome the upcoming high-level visit of Myanmar officials to Bangladesh.

The crisis has generated multiple implications for neighbouring States and the larger region, including the risk of inter-communal strife.

We should not be surprised if decades of discrimination and double standards in treatment of the Rohingya create openings for radicalization.
In moving forward, we need an effective partnership with the Myanmar authorities, especially the military.  All involved should refrain from any actions that could exacerbate the precarious situation on the ground.
I welcome the participation here today of National Security Adviser U Thaung Tun – as well as the Permanent Representative of Bangladesh, Masud Bin Momen.

I appreciate the National Security Adviser’s efforts to engage in dialogue with various stakeholders during the high-level week of the General Assembly.

In addition to discussions with the United Nations Secretariat on future cooperation, the Myanmar delegation has reached out to Bangladesh to revive dialogue.

Myanmar has also engaged the Association of Southeast Asian Nations for desperately needed humanitarian assistance.

I look forward to effective and credible follow-up to the authorities’ stated commitment to greater access, including for the international community, the media and humanitarian actors.

The regional cooperation with Myanmar will also be essential, and the United Nations fully stands behind this.

I welcome the important role played by Foreign Minister Retno [Marsudi] of Indonesia in this respect. She has been advocating for an approach that echoes the three steps I have been emphasizing and is also what many countries have been seeking.

The crisis has underlined an urgent need for a political solution to the root causes of the violence.

The core of the problem is protracted statelessness and its associated discrimination.

The recommendations of the Advisory Commission on Rakhine provide a blueprint for the longer-term future.

The Muslims of Rakhine State should be granted nationality.  The present Myanmar citizenship legislation only allows it partially.  We encourage Myanmar to revise it in line with international standards.

In the interim, an effective verification exercise as previously foreseen should allow those entitled to be granted citizenship according to the present laws.

All others must be able to obtain a legal status that allows them to lead a normal life, including freedom of movement and access to labour markets, education and health services.

I appeal to the leaders of Myanmar, including military leaders, to condemn incitement to racial hatred and violence, and take all measures to defuse tensions between communities.

We have taken good note of declarations by Myanmar authorities that no one is above the law.  There is a clear need to ensure accountability for perpetrators of human rights violations, to curb the current violence and to prevent future abuses.

The United Nations will remain a close partner to Myanmar to address these urgent issues.

We have no agenda other than to help Myanmar advance the well-being of all the country’s people.

We have no interest other than to see all communities enjoying peace, security, prosperity and mutual respect.

And we are committed to nothing less than easing the heart-breaking suffering of so many vulnerable people while forging a lasting solution that affirms shared values, promotes mutual respect and upholds human dignity.

I call on the Security Council to stand united and to support efforts to urgently end this tragedy.

Thank you very much, Mr. President.

(Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar)၏ ဥကၠဌ Mr. Marzuki DARUSMAN ၏ ထုတ္ျပန္ခ်က္

(Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar)၏ ဥကၠဌ

Mr. Marzuki DARUSMAN ၏ ထုတ္ျပန္ခ်က္

လူ႔အခြင့္အေရး ေကာင္စီ ဆုံးျဖတ္ခ်က္အစီရင္ခံစာ (၃၄/၂၂) အရ တည္ေထာင္ခဲ့သည့္

နိုင္ငံတကာဆိုင္ရာ တရားမၽွတေသာ ျမန္မာျပည္တြင္း အခ်က္အလက္ရွာေဖြေရးအဖြဲ႕

 

လူ႔အခြင့္အေရး ေကာင္စီ (၃၆)ႀကိမ္ေျမာက္ အစည္းအေဝး

အစီအစဥ္ (၄)

(၁၉) စက္တင္ဘာ (၂၀၁၇) ခုႏွစ္

ဂ်ီနီဘာၿမိဳ႕

 

ေလးစားရပါေသာသမၼတမွူးႀကီး၊ ေက်ာ္ၾကားေသာ ကိုယ္စားလွယ္မ်ား၊ ေလ့လာအကဲခတ္သူမ်ား၊ ဂုဏ္သေရရွိ အမ်ိဳးသမီး၊ အမ်ိဳးသားမ်ား ခင္ဗ်ား။ ။

လူ႔အခြင့္အေရး ေကာင္စီ ဆုံးျဖတ္ခ်က္ အစီရင္ခံစာ (၃၄/၂၂) အရ တည္ေထာင္ခဲ့သည့္ နိုင္ငံတကာဆိုင္ရာ တရားမၽွတေသာ ျမန္မာျပည္တြင္း အခ်က္အလက္ရွာေဖြေရးအဖြဲ႕ (Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar)၏ ဥကၠဌအေနျဖင့္ ပထမဦးဆုံးအႀကိမ္ ယခု အစည္းအေဝးေကာင္စီအား ‌ေျပာၾကားခြင့္ ရသည့္အတြက္ ဂုဏ္ယူမိပါသည္။ ယင္းအစီရင္ခံစာတြင္ လူ႔အခြင့္အေရးေကာင္စီမွ “ရခိုင္ျပည္နယ္၌ လုံျခဳံေရး၊ လူ႔အခြင့္အေရး၊ လူသားခ်င္း စာနာေထာက္ထားေရး ကိစၥမ်ား ျပင္းျပင္းထန္ထန္ ပိုမို ဆိုးရြားလာျခင္း ႏွင့္ပတ္သက္၍” စိုးရိမ္ပူပန္မွု ႀကီးမားေၾကာင္း ေျပာၾကားခဲ့ပါသည္။ လက္ရွိအခ်ိန္အထိ ျမန္မာျပည္တြင္း ျဖစ္ေနဆက္ အျဖစ္အပ်က္မ်ားအရ အမွန္တကယ္ ဘာျဖစ္ခဲ့သည္၊ မည္သူေတြက တာဝန္ရွိသည္ တို႔ကို သိရွိရန္ တရားမၽွတေသာ သီးျခား အခ်က္အလက္ရွာေဖြေရး အဖြဲ႕တစ္ခု၏ စစ္ေဆးမွု ဆက္လက္ လိုအပ္ေနေၾကာင္း သိရွိရပါသည္။ ကၽြန္ုပ္တို႔သည္ လက္ရွိပဋိပကၡ၏ ခက္ခဲရွုပ္ေထြးမွုမ်ားကို သတိရွိလ်က္၊ လူ႔အခြင့္အေရး ခ်ိဳးေဖာက္မွု စြပ္စြဲခ်က္မ်ား၏ ေလးနက္မွုကို စိတ္ပူပန္စြာ၊ ဤလုပ္ငန္းတာဝန္၏ အေရးပါမွုကို ေလးစားဂုဏ္ယူမိပါသည္။

လူ႔အခြင့္အေရး ေကာင္စီ ဆုံးျဖတ္ခ်က္အစီရင္ခံစာ (၃၄/၂၂) စာပုဒ္ (၁၁) အရ ျပ႒ာန္းထား‌ေသာ ကၽြန္ုပ္တို႔၏ မန္ဒိတ္တာဝန္မွာ “တပ္မေတာ္ႏွင့္ လုံျခဳံေရးတပ္ဖြဲ႕မ်ားက မၾကာေသးခင္အခ်ိန္တြင္း၊ အထူးသျဖင့္ ရခိုင္ျပည္နယ္ရွိ ပဋိပကၡမ်ားၾကားတြင္ လူ႔အခြင့္အေရး ခ်ိဳးေဖာက္မွုမ်ားရွိခဲ့သည္ ဆိုေသာ စြပ္စြဲခ်က္မ်ားႏွင့္ သက္ဆိုင္ၿပီး အခ်က္အလက္ အေျခအ‌ေနမ်ားကို စုံစမ္းစစ္ေဆးရန္” ျဖစ္ပါသည္။ ကၽြန္ုပ္တို႔၏ လုပ္ပိုင္ခြင့္ အာဏာမွာ အထိကအားျဖင့္ ရခိုင္ျပည္နယ္၌ ရည္ရြယ္ထားေသာ္လည္း ျမန္မာနိုင္ငံ တဝွမ္းလုံး၊ အထူးသျဖင့္ လက္နက္ကိုင္တိုက္ပြဲမ်ားရွိခဲ့‌ေသာ အစိတ္အပိုင္းမ်ားအတြက္လည္း အႀကိဳးသက္ေရာက္မွု ရွိသည္ဟု နားလည္ထားပါသည္။ အဆိုပါကိစၥႏွင့္စပ္လ်ဥ္း၍ လူ႔အခြင့္အေရး ခ်ိဳးေဖာက္မွုမ်ားရွိေၾကာင္း ေလးနက္ေသာ စြပ္စြဲခ်က္မ်ား ကခ်င္ႏွင့္ရွမ္းျပည္နယ္ေျမာက္ပိုင္းမွ ဆက္လက္ ေပၚထြက္လာလ်က္ ျဖစ္၍ အခ်က္အလက္ရွာေဖြေရးအဖြဲ႕မွ ယင္းကိစၥ တို႔ကိုလည္း ဆန္းစစ္ပါလိမ့္မည္။

“မၾကာေသးခင္အခ်ိန္တြင္း” ဆိုေသာ ေဝါဟာရသည္ (၂၀၁၁) ခုႏွစ္ေနာက္ပိုင္း အခ်ိန္အေပၚ အာ႐ုံစိုက္ရန္ ကၽြန္ုပ္တို႔သတ္မွတ္လိုက္ပါသည္။ ၎ခုႏွစ္သည္ ျမန္မာနိုင္ငံ၏ မ်ားမၾကာမီက သမိုင္းေၾကာင္းတြင္ တိုင္းရင္းသားဆက္ဆံေရးႏွင့္ ပတ္သက္၍ အေရးပါေသာအခ်ိန္ျဖစ္ပါသည္။ (၂၀၁၁) ခုႏွစ္အတြင္း ျမန္မာနိုင္ငံေျမာက္ပိုင္း၌ အပစ္အခတ္ရပ္စဲေရး ယိုယြင္းခ်က္မ်ားႏွင့္ တင္းမာမွုမ်ား အရွိန္ျမင့္ စတင္ခဲ့ၿပီး (၂၀၁၂)တြင္ ရခိုင္ျပည္နယ္ေျမာက္ပိုင္း၌ ပမာဏႀကီးမားေသာအၾကမ္းဖက္မွုမ်ား ျဖစ္ေစရန္ ဦးေဆာင္ခဲ့သည္ဟု သိရပါသည္။ ဤသို႔ဆိုခဲ့သည္ရွိေသာ္၊ အခ်က္အလက္ရွာေဖြေရးအဖြဲ႕ (အက္ဖ္အက္ဖ္အမ္)သည္ ရွာ‌ေဖြေတြ႕ရွိခ်က္မ်ားကို က်ယ္ျပန္႔ေသာ သမိုင္းစဥ္၊ လူမွုေရး ႏွင့္ နိုင္ငံေရး ဆိုင္ရာအေျခအေနမ်ားအား သက္ဆိုင္စြာ စဥ္းစားတင္ျပနိုင္ရန္ ႀကိဳးစားသြားပါမည္။

ထို႔အျပင္ ဤဆုံးျဖတ္ခ်က္အစီရင္ခံစာအပါ ကၽြန္ေတာ္တို႔၏ ျဖစ္ရပ္မွန္ထုတ္ျပန္ခ်က္တြင္ ထည့္သြင္းတင္ၿပ သင့္ေသာ ဥပေဒခ်ိဳးေဖာက္မွု စြပ္စြဲခ်က္မ်ားစာရင္း ရွိပါသည္။ အထူးသျဖင့္ ၎စာရင္းႏွင့္ အတူတူ မၾကာေသးမီက လုံျခဳံေရး စစ္စခန္းမ်ားကို ဝင္ေရာက္တိုက္ခိုက္မွုရွိခဲ့ေသာေၾကာင့္ ျမန္မာ့တပ္မေတာ္ တပ္ဖြဲ႕မ်ားက လုံျခဳံေရး ေအာ္ပေရးရွင္းအေနႏွင့္ ျပန္လည္တုန္႔ျပန္မွုျပဳရာတြင္ လူအလုံးလိုက္ သတ္ျဖတ္မွုမ်ား၊  က်ဴးလြန္စြာ အဓမၼျပဳက်င့္မွုမ်ား၊ ညႇင္းပမ္းႏွိပ္စက္မွုမ်ား၊ မုဒိမ္းက်င့္မွုမ်ား၊ ရြာလုံးလိုက္ မီးရွို႔ ေလာင္ကၽြမ္းမွုမ်ား ျပဳလုပ္ခဲ့သည္ဟု စြပ္စြဲခ်က္မ်ား ေပၚေပါက္လာပါသည္။ တခ်ိဳ႕ သတင္းထုတ္ျပန္ခ်က္မ်ားအရ ဘဂၤလားေဒ့ရွ္နိုင္ငံ နယ္စပ္ေဒသမ်ား၌ ျမႇုပ္ႏွံထားေသာ ေျမျမႇုပ္ဗုံးမ်ားေၾကာင့္ ကေလးငယ္မ်ားအပါအဝင္ အၾကမ္းဖက္မွုမွ ထြက္ေျပးရန္ ႀကိဳးစားေသာ လူမ်ား  ကိုယ္လက္အဂၤါ ခ်ိဳ႕တဲ့စြာ ဒဏ္ရာရေစျခင္း၊ အသက္ဆုံးရွုံးေစျခင္း တို႔ျဖစ္သည္ဟု သိရပါသည္။ တျခား တင္ျပခ်က္မ်ားအရ ရိုဟင္ဂ်ာလူမ်ိဳးမ်ားအား လူ႔ဂုဏ္သိကၡာ ကင္းမဲ့ေစေသာ ဝါဒျဖန္႔ခ်ီမွု စကားမ်ားႏွင့္ သူတို႔သည္ လူသားမ်ား မဟုတ္ေၾကာင္း၊ တိရစၧာန္ ဖ်က္ေကာင္မ်ားသာ ျဖစ္ေၾကာင္း ၾကမ္းတမ္းစြာ ေျပာဆိုမွုမ်ား ရွိေနေၾကာင္းလည္း သိရပါသည္။ ကမၻာအႏွံ့မွာ ႀကီးႀကီးက်ယ္က်ယ္ ရက္စက္ယုတ္မာမွုမ်ား မက်ဴးလြန္ခင္ ဤကဲ့သို႔ မုန္းတီးစကားမ်ား စ၍ေျပာဆိုဖြယ္ ရွိတတ္ေသာေၾကာင့္ ယခု ေကာင္စီသည္ လက္ရွိျဖစ္ေပၚေနေသာ စိုးရိမ္ဖြယ္ အရိပ္လကၡဏာမ်ားကို အသိအမွတ္ျပဳထားပါသည္။ ကၽြန္ေတာ္တို႔သည္ ယင္းကဲ့သို႔ အေၾကာင္းျပခ်က္မ်ား ၾကားသိခဲ့ရသည့္ အတြက္ စိုးရိမ္စိတ္လိုက္မွုမ်ား ျဖစ္ခဲ့ၿပီး၊ ဤအေၾကာင္းအရာမ်ားကို ေသခ်ာစြာ စုံစမ္းစစ္ေဆးပါမည္။ ေနာက္ဆုံးအေနႏွင့္ လူ႔အခြင့္အေရး ခ်ိဳးေဖာက္မွုမ်ား ရွိခဲ့သည္ ျဖစ္ေသာ္၊ မရွိခဲ့သည္ ျဖစ္ေသာ္၊ ကၽြန္ေတာ္ ကိုယ္တိုင္ကလည္း ခ်ိဳးေဖာက္မွုမ်ားရွိခဲ့သည္ဟု အခ်ိန္မတိုင္ မေျပာခ်င္ပါ၊ သို႔ေပမလယ့္လည္း၊ အထူးအေရးတႀကီး အေရးျပဳရန္လိုအပ္ေသာ လူသူခ်င္း စာနာေထာက္ထားသင့္သည့္ ေသေရးရွင္ေရး အေျခအေနကာလ ေရာက္ရွိေနၿပီ ဆိုတာ ကၽြန္ေတာ္တို႔ အတြက္ သိသာထင္ရွား ေနပါသည္။ တစ္လအတြင္း ဘဂၤလားေဒ့နိုင္ငံသို႔ ခိုလွုံရန္ ထြက္ေျပးလာေသာ ဒုကၡသည္ (၄) သိန္းေက်ာ္ေနၿပီျဖစ္ၿပီး ဤကိန္းဂဏန္းသည္ လက္ရွိအထိ ဆက္လက္ ျမင့္မားေနဆဲ ျဖစ္၏။ တခ်ိဳ႕ သတင္းအေၾကာင္းျပခ်က္မ်ားအရ ထိခိုက္သည့္ ေဒသမ်ားတြင္ ရိုဟင္ဂ်ာရြာၿမိဳ႕ေပါင္း (၂၀၀) ေက်ာ္ ဘာမွမက်န္ ဟင္းလင္းျဖစ္သြာေၾကာင္း သိရပါသည္။

ဤခ်ိဳးေဖာက္ခ်က္မ်ား၊ အၾကမ္းဖက္မွုမ်ားရွိသည္ဟု စြပ္စြဲခံရေသာ ေနရာေဒသမ်ားအား ကၽြန္ေတာ္တို႔ ကိုယ္တိုင္ မ်က္ျမင္ သက္ေသရွိရန္၊ ထိခိုက္ခံခဲ့ရေသာ လူသားမ်ားႏွင့္ လည္းေကာင္း၊ အရာအရွိမ်ားႏွင့္ လည္းေကာင္း တိုက္ရိုက္စကားေျပာနိုင္ရန္ အေရးႀကီးပါသည္။ ထိုအေၾကာင္းေၾကာင့္ ကၽြန္ေတာ္တို႔သည္ ျမန္မာနိုင္ငံ အစိုးရႏွင့္ ဆက္သြယ္ၿပီး အစိုးရ၏ ပူးေပါင္းေဆာင္ရြက္မွုႏွင့္ လြတ္လပ္ ၿပီးျပည့္စုံ စြာ သြားလာနိုင္ခြင့္ကို ေတာင္းဆိုထားပါသည္။ အစိုးရကလည္း အမွန္တရားကို လူအမ်ားအား သိေစလိုေၾကာင္း ေဖာ္ျပခဲ့ေသာေၾကာင့္ ၎ခြင့္ေတာင္းခ်က္ကို အစိုးရက လိုက္ေရာလက္ခံမည္ဟု ကၽြန္ေတာ္တို႔က  ေမၽွာ္လင့္ပါသည္။  ျမန္မာနိုင္ငံ အစိုးရႏွင့္ ျပည္သူလူထုတို႔က မိမိတို႔၏ ထင္ျမင္ခ်က္ႏွင့္ သက္ေသအေထာက္အထားမ်ားအား အခ်က္အလက္ရွာေဖြေရး မစ္ရွင္းသို႔ တိုက္ရိုက္ျပသမည္ဆိုလၽွင္ အစိုးရႏွင့္ ျပည္သူလူထုတို႔ အတြက္ အေကာင္းဆုံး အႀကိဳးသက္ေရာက္မွု ရွိမည္ဟု ကၽြန္ေတာ္တို႔ ယုံၾကည္ပါသည္။ ယခုလက္ရွိအခန္းအနားကို အသုံးခ်ၿပီး ကၽြန္ေတာ္တို႔၏ ေတာင္းဆိုခ်က္ကို ျမန္မာအစိုးရက ျဖည့္စည္းေပးရန္၊ အထူးျဖင့္ ကၽြန္ေတာ္တို႔ အဖြဲ႕ကို နိုင္ငံအတြင္းဝင္ခြင့္ျပဳရန္ ထပ္မံတိုက္တြန္းလိုပါသည္။

ကၽြန္ေတာ္တို႔သည္ ဆက္လက္၍ မိမိတို႔၏ လုပ္ပိုင္ခြင့္ အာဏာအရ သက္ဆိုင္ေသာ နိုင္ငံတကာ စံခ်ိန္စံညႊန္းမ်ားႏွင့္အညီ၊ အေကာင္းဆုံးအေနႏွင့္ အသိအမွတ္ျပဳထားေသာ ကၽြန္ေတာ္တို႔ ေရွ႕ေျပး မစ္ရွင္မ်ားစြာက တီထြင္ထားခဲ့ေပးသည့္ လူ႔အခြင့္အေရး အခ်က္အလက္ရွာေဖြေရးနည္းစနစ္မ်ား အသုံးျပဳ၍ ေဆာင္ရြက္သြားပါမည္။ ဤတို႔တြင္ “do no harm” ဟုေခၚေသာ အႏၲရာယ္ လုံးဝျပဳလုပ္ျခင္း မရွိဘဲ၊ မၽွမၽွတတႏွင့္ ဘက္မလိုက္ေသာ လုပ္ေဆာင္ခ်က္မ်ား ပါဝင္ပါသည္။ ေခတ္မီနည္းပညာမ်ား အားလုံးကို အသုံးျပဳပါမည္။ ၿဂိဳလ္တုပုံရိပ္ (Satellite Imagery) မ်ား၊ လာမေတြ႕နိုင္သူမ်ား အတြက္ အေဝးမွ ဆက္သြယ္မွုမ်ား၊ ရရွိထားေသာ ဓာတ္ပုံ၊ ဗီဒီယိုတို႔အား မွန္ကန္ေၾကာင္း စစ္ေဆးေရး ျပဳလုပ္ပါမည္။

ကၽြန္ေတာ္ အေလးေပးရန္ဆႏၵရွိတာကေတာ့ အခ်က္အလက္ရွာေဖြေရးအဖြဲ႕က ျမန္မာနိုင္ငံရွိ လူ႔အခြင့္အေရး အေျခအေနအား အျမင္ေစာင္း ဘက္လိုက္ထင္ျမင္ခ်က္မ်ား မရွိဘဲ ရွိသမၽွ စုံစမ္းခ်က္မ်ားကို တိတိက်က်၊ တရားမၽွတစြာ တီးျဖတ္ထားေသာ အခ်က္အလက္မ်ားေပၚ မူတည္၍သာ အကဲျဖတ္ၿပီးတင္ျပပါမည္။ သက္ေသအေထာက္အထားရွိေသာ ေနရာမ်ားသို႔ ကၽြန္ေတာ္တို႔ လိုက္သြားပါမည္။ အခ်က္အလက္ရွာေဖြေရးအဖြဲ႕သည္ ရွိသမၽွ ရင္းျမစ္မွ ရရွိေသာ အေထာက္အထား အေၾကာင္းအရာမ်ားကို ဖိတ္ေခၚပါသည္။ ၎တို႔ကို ကၽြန္ေတာ္တို႔ ယခုပင္ ပမာဏထုထည္ႀကီးမားစြာ ရရွိၿပီးသား ျဖစ္ပါသည္။ ယခု အခြင့္အေရးကို အသုံးခ်ၿပီး ကၽြန္ေတာ္ကိုယ္တိုင္ ျမန္မာနိုင္ငံအစိုးရ အပါအဝင္ အေၾကာင္းအရာ ေပးကမ္းလိုသူမ်ားအားလုံးကို ထပ္ၿပီး ဖိတ္ၾကားလိုပါသည္။

(၂၀၁၇) ခုႏွစ္ ဩဂုတ္လ (၈) ရက္ေန႔ တြင္ အစိုးရ ခန္႔အပ္ထားေသာ “ရခိုင္ျပည္နယ္ ေမာင္ေတာ္ၿမိဳ႕ စုံစမ္းစစ္ေဆးေရးေကာ္မရွင္”က ေနာက္ဆုံး တင္ျပခ်က္မွတ္တမ္း အက်ဥ္းခ်ဳပ္ကို ထုတ္ျပန္ေၾကညာခဲ့ပါသည္။ ၎အက်ဥ္းခ်ဳပ္တြင္ ေကာ္မရွင္က မ်ားျပားေသာ စြပ္စြဲခ်က္မ်ားကို အတည္မျပဳနိုင္ေၾကာင္း၊ ဆက္လက္စုံစမ္းရန္ လိုအပ္ေၾကာင္း ေျပာၾကားၿပီး၊ ျပင္းထန္ေသာ လူ႔အခြင့္အေရး ခ်ိဳးေဖာက္မွု စြပ္စြဲခ်က္မ်ားအား ျငင္းဆိုခဲ့ပါသည္။ ကၽြန္ေတာ္တို႔အေနႏွင့္ အစိုးရအား ယင္းတင္ျပခ်က္မွတ္တမ္းကို ခ်က္ခ်င္း ထုတ္ျပန္ရန္ တိုက္တြန္းလိုက္ပါသည္။ ဤမွတ္တမ္း မပါဝင္ခဲ့လၽွင္ ေကာ္မရွင္၏ အေလးနက္ၾကမွုႏွင့္ သက္ဆိုင္မွုမ်ားအား မခံ့မွန္းနိုင္ပါ။ ကၽြန္ေတာ္တို႔အဖြဲ႕ လုပ္ငန္းမ်ားတြင္လည္း ေကာ္မရွင္၏အက်ိဳးသက္ေရာက္မွုေသခ်ာေပါက္ အကန႔္အသတ္ရွိသြားမည္ျဖစ္ပါသည္။

အလြန္အေရးပါေသာ တင္ျပခ်က္မွတ္တမ္း  ေနာက္တစ္ခုကို ၂၀၁၇ ခုႏွစ္ ဩဂုတ္လ ၂၄ ရက္ေန႔တြင္ ထုတ္ေဝျခင္းရွိခဲ့ပါသည္။ ၎မွတ္တမ္းသည္ ကိုဖီအာနမ္ ဦးေဆာင္ေသာ ရခိုင္ျပည္နယ္ဆိုင္ရာ အႀကံေပးေကာ္မရွင္မွ တင္ျပခ်က္ျဖစ္၏။ အတြင္းတြင္ အႀကံေပးေကာ္မရွင္က လူ႔အခြင့္အေရး ခ်ိဳးေဖာက္မွု စြပ္စြဲခ်က္မ်ားႏွင့္ ပတ္သက္ၿပီး အေသးစိတ္အခ်က္အလက္ပါရွိေသာ အေျခအေနကိစၥမ်ားအား စုံစမ္းစစ္ေဆးရန္ လုပ္ပိုင္ခြင့္အာဏာ မရွိခဲ့ေၾကာင္း၊ မိမိ တာဝန္မွာ “အသင္းအပင္းဆိုင္ရာ၊ ဖြဲ႕စည္းတည္ေဆာက္ေရးဆိုင္ရာ အေၾကာင္းတရားမ်ားေၾကာင့္ ရခိုင္ျပည္နယ္၏ ၿငိမ္းခ်မ္းေရး၊ တရားမၽွတေရး ႏွင့္ ဖြံ့ၿဖိဳးတိုးတက္ေရးတို႔ ေအာက္ေျခကလွိုက္စားေနမွုမ်ားရွိေၾကာင္း ထုတ္ျပန္ေျပာၾကားရန္၊ တျပည္နယ္းလုံးပါ လူမွုအသိုင္းအဝိုင္းအားလုံး၏ သုခခ်မ္းသာ တိုးတက္ေအာင္ အေထာက္အကူျပဳေသာ ခိုင္လုံသည့္ ေျခလွမ္းမ်ားအဆိုျပဳရန္” ျဖစ္ေၾကာင္း ေျပာဆိုခဲ့ပါသည္။ အခ်က္အလက္ရွာေဖြေရးအဖြဲ႕သည္ အႀကံေပးေကာ္မရွင္၏ မွတ္တမ္းအား ႀကိဳဆိုလက္ခံ၍ ၎၏အဆိုျပဳခ်က္မ်ားကို ေစာေစာစီးစီး စတင္လုပ္ေဆာင္ရန္ တိုက္တြန္းလိုက္ပါသည္။ ဤကဲ့သို႔ လုပ္ေဆာင္ရန္ အေလာတႀကီးလိုအပ္မွုမွာ နဂိုမူလတည္းက ႐ူပ္ေထြး၊ ထိခိုက္လြယ္ၿပီး မေရမရာလွေသာ အေျခအေနမ်ား  ဩဂုတ္လ (၂၅) ရက္ေန႔မွ စ၍ ပိုျပင္းထန္လာေသာေၾကာင့္ ျဖစ္ပါသည္။

သမၼတမွူးႀကီးခင္ဗ်ား။ ။

ယခင္က က်ဴးလြန္ခဲ့ေသာ မတရားမွုကို တရားမၽွတ ျဖစ္ေအာင္ ျပဳျပင္ေပးရန္ ႏွင့္ အနာဂတ္မွာ ဆက္လက္မျဖစ္ေအာင္ တားဆီးကာကြယ္ရန္ ျဖစ္ရပ္မွန္ အတိအက် အေၾကာင္းအရာမ်ား တည္ေထာင္ၿပီး၊ အၾကမ္းဖက္မွု၏ လက္ရင္းအေၾကာင္းခံကို အမည္တပ္ေခၚရန္ လိုသည္။

ကၽြန္ေတာ္တို႔သည္ အခ်က္အလက္ရွာေဖြေရးအဖြဲ႕၏ လုပ္ပိုင္ခြင့္အာဏာက က်ဴးလြန္သူမ်ား တာဝန္ခံမွုရွိရန္ အတြက္ အလြန္အေရးပါေၾကာင္း ေသခ်ာစြာ နားလည္ပါသည္။

ရခိုင္ျပည္နယ္ ေျမာက္ပိုင္းကိစၥႏွင့္ ပက္သက္၍ ကၽြန္ေတာ္တို႔သည္ ျဖစ္ေပၚေနလ်က္ရွိေသာ အေျခအေနကို အေသးစိတ္ လိုက္ရွူေလ့လ‌ာေနဆဲျဖစ္ပါသည္။ ကၽြန္ေတာ္တို႔ အဖြဲ႕ဝင္သားမ်ားကို အေရးေပၚအေနႏွင့္ ဘဂၤလားေဒ့ရွ္နိုင္ငံသို႔ လႊတ္ခဲ့ပါသည္။ ယင္းအဖြဲ႕ဝင္သားမ်ားသည္ ေလာေလာဆယ္ အေၾကာင္းအရာမ်ားကို စုစည္း၍ စြပ္စြဲခ်က္မ်ားကို မွန္မမွန္ စစ္ေဆးေနဆဲပါ။ ကၽြန္ေတာ္တို႔ကလည္း ရခိုင္ျပည္နယ္ ေျမာက္ပိုင္းရွိ အၾကမ္းဖက္မွုျဖစ္ရပ္တြင္ ပါဝင္ေသာ လုပ္ပိုင္ရွင္မ်ား အားလုံးသို႔ လက္ရွိျဖစ္ရပ္မ်ားကို ခ်က္ခ်င္းရပ္တန္႔ပါဟု ပူးေပါင္းေျပာၾကားလိုပါသည္။ အျပည္ျပည္ဆိုင္ရာ စံသတ္မွတ္ခ်က္မ်ား၊ အဆင့္အတန္းမ်ားကို တစ္သေဝမတိမ္း လိုက္နာရန္ ဆက္လက္တိုက္တြန္းပါသည္။ ထို႔အျပင္၊ ကၽြန္ေတာ္တို႔သည္ အထူးသျဖင့္ သိန္းခ်ီစြာ စြန္႔ခြာခဲ့ၾကေသာ လူသားမ်ားႏွင့္ ထိခိုက္ေနေသာ ရခိုင္ျပည္နယ္ရွိ သီးသန႔္လူစုမ်ား အတြက္ ကယ္ဆယ္ေရး ရိကၡာပစၥည္း ျဖန္႔ေဝေရးမ်ား အျပည့္အစုံ လာေရာက္ခြင့္ေပးရန္  ပူးေပါင္းေတာင္းဆိုပါသည္။

သမၼတမွူးႀကီးခင္ဗ်ား။ ။

ေကာင္စီ ဆုံးျဖတ္ခ်က္အစီရင္ခံစာ (၃၄/၂၂) သည္ မတ္လတြင္ တည္ေထာင္ခဲ့သည္ ျဖစ္ေသာ္လည္း ကၽြန္ေတာ္ကိုယ္တိုင္ ဥကၠဌအေနႏွင့္ ဇူလိုင္လ (၂၇)ရက္ ေရာက္ရွိခဲ့ေသာ အခ်ိန္မွ ဤအခ်က္အလက္ရွာေဖြေရးအဖြဲ႕ သည္ အေဝးမွလုပ္ငန္းမ်ား  စတင္ေဆာင္ရြက္ နိုင္ခဲ့သည္ ျဖစ္ပါသည္။ အဖြဲ႕ဝင္သားအားလုံး ဂ်ီနီဘာၿမိဳ႕တြင္ ဩဂုတ္လ (၂၁)ရက္‌ေန႔မွစ၍ လူကိုယ္တိုင္ ပူးေပါင္းေတြ႕ဆုံနိုင္ခဲ့ၾကျခင္း ျဖစ္သည္။ ထိုအပတ္တြင္ ကၽြန္ေတာ္တို႔သည္ အသုံးအႏွုန္းမ်ား၏ ကိုးကားခ်က္၊ နည္းစနစ္ႏွင့္ စုစုေပါင္းအလုပ္အစီအစဥ္မ်ားကို ေဆြးေႏြး သေဘာတူညီခဲ့ပါသည္။ ကၽြန္ေတာ္တို႔သည္ အစီရင္ခံစာပါ စာလုံးသုံးႏွုန္းမ်ားအား မိမိတို႔ လုပ္ပိုင္ခြင့္အာဏာ၏ အခ်ိန္ကာလအရ၊ ပထဝီအေနအထားအရ ထိေရာက္ေသာ သတ္မွတ္ခ်က္ေဘာင္ေတြကို က်ယ္ျပန္႔စြာ အဓိပၸာယ္ေကာက္ယူခ်က္ယူနိုင္ရန္ ျပန္လည္ စစ္‌ေဆးထားပါသည္။ ဤကိစၥမ်ားကို ရရွိနိုင္ေသာ အခ်ိန္ႏွင့္အရင္းအျမစ္မ်ားအား လက္ေတြ႕က် ထည့္သြင္းစဥ္းစားထားပါသည္။

ကၽြန္ေတာ္တို႔သည္ လူႀကီးမင္းတို႔ အာ႐ုံစူးစိုက္မွု ရွိသည္ကို ေက်းဇူးတင္ပါတယ္။

 

Secretary-General’s Address to the General Assembly

19 September 2017

Secretary-General’s Address to the General Assembly

[Trilingual, as delivered]  

Watch the video on webcast.un.org:

[*****Scroll further down for all-English version]

I am here in a spirit of gratitude and humility for the trust you have placed in me to serve the world’s peoples.

“We the peoples”, and the United Nations, face grave challenges.

Our world is in trouble.  People are hurting and angry.  They see insecurity rising, inequality growing, conflict spreading and climate changing.

The global economy is increasingly integrated, but our sense of global community may be disintegrating.

Societies are fragmented.  Political discourse is polarized.  Trust within and among countries is being driven down by those who demonize and divide.

We are a world in pieces.  We need to be a world at peace.

And I strongly believe that, together, we can build peace.  We can restore trust and create a better world for all.

I will focus today on seven threats and tests that stand in our way.

For each, the dangers are all too clear.  Yet for each, if we act as truly united nations, we can find answers.

First, the nuclear peril.

The use of nuclear weapons should be unthinkable.  Even the threat of their use can never be condoned.

But today global anxieties about nuclear weapons are at the highest level since the end of the Cold War.

The fear is not abstract.  Millions of people live under a shadow of dread cast by the provocative nuclear and missile tests of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

Within the DPRK itself, such tests do nothing to ease the plight of those who are suffering hunger and severe violations of their human rights.

I condemn those tests unequivocally.

I call on the DPRK and all Member States to comply fully with Security Council resolutions.

Last week’s unanimous adoption of resolution 2375 tightens sanctions and sends a clear message regarding the country’s international obligations.

I appeal to the Council to maintain its unity.

Only that unity can lead to the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula and — as the resolution recognizes — create an opportunity for diplomatic engagement to resolve the crisis.

When tensions rise, so does the chance of miscalculation.  Fiery talk can lead to fatal misunderstandings.

The solution must be political.  This is a time for statesmanship.

We must not sleepwalk our way into war.

More broadly, all countries must show greater commitment to the universal goal of a world without nuclear weapons.  The nuclear-weapon states have a special responsibility to lead.

Today, proliferation is creating unimaginable danger, and disarmament is paralyzed.

There is an urgent need to prevent proliferation, to promote disarmament and to preserve gains made in these directions.

These goals are linked.  Progress on one will generate progress on the other.

Let me turn to the global threat of terrorism.

Nothing justifies terrorism — no cause, no grievance.

Terrorism continues to take a rising toll of death and devastation.

It is destroying societies, destabilizing regions and diverting energy from more productive pursuits.

National and multilateral counter-terrorism efforts have indeed disrupted networks, reclaimed territory, prevented attacks and saved lives.

But we need to intensify this work.  Stronger international cooperation remains crucial against terrorism.

I am grateful to the General Assembly for approving one of my first reform initiatives: the establishment of the UN Office on Counter-Terrorism.

Next year, I intend to convene the first-ever gathering of heads of counter-terrorism agencies of Member States to forge a new International Counter-Terrorism Partnership.

But it is not enough to fight terrorists on the battlefield or to deny them funds.

We must do more to address the roots of radicalization, including real and perceived injustices and high levels of unemployment and grievance among young people.

Political, religious and community leaders have a duty to stand up against hatred and serve as models of tolerance and moderation.

Together, we need to make full use of UN instruments, and expand our efforts to support survivors.

Experience has also shown that harsh crackdowns and heavy-handed approaches are counterproductive.

As soon as we believe that violations of human rights and democratic freedoms are necessary to win the fight, we might have lost the war.

Third, unresolved conflicts and systematic violations of international humanitarian law.

We are all shocked by the dramatic escalation of sectarian tensions in Myanmar’s Rakhine State.  A vicious cycle of persecution, discrimination, radicalization and violent repression has led more than 400,000 desperate people to flee, putting regional stability at risk.

I take note of State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi’s address today – and her intention to implement the recommendations of the Advisory Commission on Rakhine State that was chaired by Kofi Annan within the shortest time possible.

Let me emphasize again: The authorities in Myanmar must end the military operations, allow unhindered humanitarian access and recognize the right of refugees to return in safety and dignity.  They must also address the grievances of the Rohingya, whose status has been left unresolved for far too long.

No one is winning today’s wars.

From Syria to Yemen, from South Sudan to the Sahel, Afghanistan and elsewhere, only political solutions can bring peace.

We should have no illusions.  We will not be able to eradicate terrorism if we do not resolve the conflicts that are creating the disorder within which violent extremists flourish.

Last week I announced the creation of a High-Level Advisory Board on Mediation.  Those eminent individuals will allow us to be more effective in brokering peace around the world.

The United Nations is forging closer partnerships with key regional organizations such as the African Union, the European Union, the League of Arab States and the Organization of Islamic Cooperation.

We continue to strengthen and modernize peacekeeping – protecting civilians and saving lives around the world.

And since taking office, I have sought to bring together the parties to conflict, as well as those that have influence on them.

As a meaningful example, I am particularly hopeful about tomorrow’s meeting on Libya.

Last month, I visited Israel and Palestine.  We must not let today’s stagnation in the peace process lead to tomorrow’s escalation.  We must restore the hopes of the people. The two-state solution remains the only way forward.  It must be pursued urgently.

But I must be frank: in too many cases, the warring parties believe war is the answer.

They may speak of a willingness to compromise.

But their actions too often betray a thirst for outright military victory, at any cost.

Violations of international humanitarian law are rampant, and impunity prevails.

Civilians are paying the highest price, with women and girls facing systematic violence and oppression.

I have seen in my country, and in my years at the United Nations, that it is possible to move from war to peace, and from dictatorship to democracy.  Let us push ahead with a surge in diplomacy today and a leap in conflict prevention for tomorrow.

Fourth, climate change puts our hopes in jeopardy.

Last year was the hottest ever.  The past decade has been the hottest on record.

Average global temperature keeps climbing, glaciers are receding and permafrost is declining.

Millions of people and trillions of assets are at risk from rising seas and other climate disruptions.

The number of natural disasters has quadrupled since 1970.

The United States, followed by China, India, the Philippines and Indonesia, have experienced the most disasters since 1995 – more than 1,600, or once every five days.

I stand in solidarity with the people of the Caribbean and the United States who have just suffered through Hurricane Irma, the longest-lasting Category 5 storm ever recorded. And Maria is already on its way.

We should not link any single weather event with climate change.  But scientists are clear that such extreme weather is precisely what their models predict will be the new normal of a warming world.

We have had to update our language to describe what is happening: we now talk of mega-hurricanes, superstorms and rain bombs.

It is time to get off the path of suicidal emissions.  We know enough today to act.  The science is unassailable.

I urge Governments to implement the historic Paris Agreement with ever greater ambition.

I commend those cities that are setting bold targets.

I welcome the initiatives of the thousands of private enterprises – including major oil and gas companies – that are betting on a clean, green future.

Energy markets tell us that green business is good business.

The falling cost of renewables is one of the most encouraging stories on the planet today.

So is the growing evidence that economies can grow as emissions go down.

New markets, more jobs, opportunities to generate trillions in economic output.

The facts are clear.  Solutions are staring us in the face. Leadership needs to catch up.

Cinquièmement, les inégalités croissantes minent les fondements de la société et le contrat social.

L’intégration des économies mondiales, l’expansion du commerce et les avancées technologiques spectaculaires ont apporté des bienfaits remarquables.

Plus de personnes se sont extirpées de la pauvreté extrême que jamais auparavant. La classe moyenne mondiale est aussi plus importante que jamais. Davantage de personnes vivent plus longtemps et en meilleure santé.

Mais les progrès ne sont pas équitables.
Nous voyons des disparités criantes dans les revenus, l’égalité des chances et l’accès aux résultats de la recherche et de l’innovation.

Huit hommes représentent autant de richesse mondiale que la moitié de l’ensemble de l’humanité.

Des régions, des pays et des communautés entiers restent loin des vagues de progrès et de croissance, livrés à eux-mêmes dans les « Rust Belts » de notre monde.

Cette exclusion a un prix : frustration, aliénation, instabilité.

Mais nous avons un plan visant à changer de cap – pour parvenir à une mondialisation équitable.

Ce plan est le Programme 2030.

La moitié de notre monde est de sexe féminin.

La moitié de notre monde a moins de 25 ans.

Nous ne pouvons pas atteindre les objectifs de développement durable sans tirer parti du pouvoir des femmes et nous appuyer sur l’énorme énergie des jeunes.

Nous savons à quelle vitesse peut s’opérer la transformation de nos jours.

Nous savons qu’avec une richesse et des actifs mondiaux équivalent à des milliards, nous ne sommes pas en manque de financements.

Trouvons la sagesse d’utiliser les outils, les plans et les ressources déjà entre nos mains pour parvenir à un développement durable et bénéfique à tous – un objectif en soi mais aussi notre meilleur instrument de prévention des conflits.

Le côté obscur de l’innovation est la sixième menace que nous devons affronter et il est passé de la frontière à la porte d’entrée.

La technologie continuera d’être au cœur des progrès partagés. Mais l’innovation, aussi essentielle soit-elle pour l’humanité, peut avoir des conséquences imprévues.

Les menaces liées à la cybersécurité s’accentuent.

La guerre cybernétique devient de moins en moins une réalité cachée.  Elle est de plus en plus capable de perturber les relations entre États et de détruire certaines des structures et des systèmes de la vie moderne.

Les progrès dans le cyberespace peuvent certes autonomiser les personnes, mais ce qu’on appelle le « Dark Web » montre que certains utilisent ce potentiel pour nuire et asservir.

L’intelligence artificielle est une nouvelle donnée qui peut stimuler le développement et améliorer les conditions de vie de façon spectaculaire. Mais elle peut aussi avoir un effet dramatique sur les marchés du travail et, en fait, sur la société mondiale et sur le tissu social même.

Le génie génétique est passé des pages de la science-fiction au marché – mais il a engendré de nouveaux dilemmes éthiques non résolus.

À moins qu’elles ne soient traitées de manière responsable, ces avancées pourraient causer des dommages incalculables.

Los Gobiernos y las organizaciones internacionales sencillamente no están preparados para esta nueva situación.

Las formas tradicionales de regulación simplemente ya no son válidas.

Está claro que este tipo de tendencias y capacidades exige una nueva generación de pensamiento estratégico, de reflexión ética y de regulación.

Las Naciones Unidas están dispuestas a ser un foro en el que los Estados Miembros, la sociedad civil, las empresas y el mundo académico puedan reunirse y hablar sobre el camino a seguir, en beneficio de todos.

Finally, I want to talk about human mobility, which I do not perceive as a threat even if some do.  I see it as a challenge that, if properly managed, can help bring the world together.

Let us be clear: we do not only face a refugee crisis; we also face a crisis of solidarity.

Every country has the right to control its own borders.  But that must be done in a way that protects the rights of people on the move.

Instead of closed doors and open hostility, we need to re-establish the integrity of the refugee protection regime and the simple decency of human compassion.  With a truly global sharing of responsibility, the number of refugees we face can be managed.

But too many states have not risen to the moment.

I commend those countries that have shown admirable hospitality to millions of forcibly displaced people.  We need to do more to support them.

We also need to do more to face the challenges of migration.  The truth is that the majority of migrants move in a well-ordered fashion, making positive contributions to their host countries and homelands.

It is when migrants move in unregulated ways that the risks become clear – risks for states but most especially risks for migrants themselves exposed to perilous journeys.

Migration has always been with us.

Climate change, demographics, instability, growing inequalities, and aspirations for a better life, as well as unmet needs in labour markets, mean it is here to stay.

The answer is effective international cooperation in managing migration to ensure that its benefits are most widely distributed, and that the human rights of all concerned are properly protected.

From my experience, I can assure you that most people prefer to realize their aspirations at home.

We must work together; development cooperation must be oriented in such a way to make sure that they can do so.

Migration should be an option, not a necessity.

We also need a much stronger commitment of the international community to crack down on human traffickers, and to protect their victims.

But let us be clear, we will not end the tragedies on the Mediterranean, the Andaman Sea and elsewhere without creating more opportunities for regular migration. This will benefit migrants and countries alike.

I myself am a migrant, as are many of you in this room. But no one expected me to risk my life on a leaky boat or to cross a desert in the back of a truck to find employment outside my country of birth.

Safe migration cannot be limited to the global elite.

Refugees, internally displaced persons and migrants are not the problem; the problem lies in conflict, persecution and hopeless poverty.

I have been pained to see the way refugees and migrants have been stereotyped and scapegoated – and to see political figures stoke resentment in search of electoral gain.

In today’s world, all societies are becoming multicultural, multiethnic and multi-religious.

This diversity must be seen as a richness, not as a threat.  But to make diversity a success, we need to invest in social cohesion, so that all people feel that their identities are respected and that they have a stake in the community as a whole.

We need to reform our world, and I am committed to reforming the United Nations.

Together, we have embarked on a comprehensive reform effort:
— to build a UN development system to support States in bettering peoples’ lives;
— to reinforce our ability to safeguard people’s peace, security and human rights;
— and to embrace management practices that advance those goals instead of hindering them.

We have launched a new victims-centered approach to preventing sexual exploitation and abuse.

We have a roadmap to achieve gender parity at the United Nations – and we are already on our way.

We are here to serve: to relieve the suffering of “we the peoples”; and to help fulfill their dreams.

We come from different corners of the world.

Our cultures, religions and traditions vary widely – and, I would say, wonderfully.

At times, there are competing interests among us.

At others, there is even open conflict.

That is exactly why we need the United Nations.

That is exactly why multilateralism is more important than ever.

We call ourselves the international community.

We must act as one, because only together, as united nations, can we fulfil the promise of the Charter and advance human dignity for all.

Thank you.  Shokran.  Xie Xie.  Merci.  Spasibo.  Gracias.  Obrigado.

*****
[All-English version]

I am here in a spirit of gratitude and humility for the trust you have placed in me to serve the world’s peoples.

“We the peoples”, and the United Nations, face grave challenges.

Our world is in trouble.  People are hurting and angry.  They see insecurity rising, inequality growing, conflict spreading and climate changing.

The global economy is increasingly integrated, but our sense of global community may be disintegrating.

Societies are fragmented.  Political discourse is polarized.  Trust within and among countries is being driven down by those who demonize and divide.

We are a world in pieces.  We need to be a world at peace.

And I strongly believe that, together, we can build peace.  We can restore trust and create a better world for all.

I will focus today on seven threats and tests that stand in our way.

For each, the dangers are all too clear.  Yet for each, if we act as truly united nations, we can find answers.

First, the nuclear peril.

The use of nuclear weapons should be unthinkable.  Even the threat of their use can never be condoned.

But today global anxieties about nuclear weapons are at the highest level since the end of the Cold War.

The fear is not abstract.  Millions of people live under a shadow of dread cast by the provocative nuclear and missile tests of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

Within the DPRK itself, such tests do nothing to ease the plight of those who are suffering hunger and severe violations of their human rights.

I condemn those tests unequivocally.

I call on the DPRK and all Member States to comply fully with Security Council resolutions.

Last week’s unanimous adoption of resolution 2375 tightens sanctions and sends a clear message regarding the country’s international obligations.

I appeal to the Council to maintain its unity.

Only that unity can lead to the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula and — as the resolution recognizes — create an opportunity for diplomatic engagement to resolve the crisis.

When tensions rise, so does the chance of miscalculation.  Fiery talk can lead to fatal misunderstandings.

The solution must be political.  This is a time for statesmanship.

We must not sleepwalk our way into war.

More broadly, all countries must show greater commitment to the universal goal of a world without nuclear weapons.  The nuclear-weapon states have a special responsibility to lead.

Today, proliferation is creating unimaginable danger, and disarmament is paralyzed.

There is an urgent need to prevent proliferation, to promote disarmament and to preserve gains made in these directions.

These goals are linked.  Progress on one will generate progress on the other.

Let me turn to the global threat of terrorism.

Nothing justifies terrorism — no cause, no grievance.

Terrorism continues to take a rising toll of death and devastation.

It is destroying societies, destabilizing regions and diverting energy from more productive pursuits.

National and multilateral counter-terrorism efforts have indeed disrupted networks, reclaimed territory, prevented attacks and saved lives.

But we need to intensify this work.  Stronger international cooperation remains crucial against terrorism.

I am grateful to the General Assembly for approving one of my first reform initiatives: the establishment of the UN Office on Counter-Terrorism.

Next year, I intend to convene the first-ever gathering of heads of counter-terrorism agencies of Member States to forge a new International Counter-Terrorism Partnership.

But it is not enough to fight terrorists on the battlefield or to deny them funds.

We must do more to address the roots of radicalization, including real and perceived injustices and high levels of unemployment and grievance among young people.

Political, religious and community leaders have a duty to stand up against hatred and serve as models of tolerance and moderation.

Together, we need to make full use of UN instruments, and expand our efforts to support survivors.

Experience has also shown that harsh crackdowns and heavy-handed approaches are counterproductive.

As soon as we believe that violations of human rights and democratic freedoms are necessary to win the fight, we might have lost the war.

Third, unresolved conflicts and systematic violations of international humanitarian law.

We are all shocked by the dramatic escalation of sectarian tensions in Myanmar’s Rakhine State.  A vicious cycle of persecution, discrimination, radicalization and violent repression has led more than 400,000 desperate people to flee, putting regional stability at risk.

I take note of State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi’s address today – and her intention to implement the recommendations of the Advisory Commission on Rakhine State that was chaired by Kofi Annan within the shortest time possible.

Let me emphasize again: The authorities in Myanmar must end the military operations, allow unhindered humanitarian access and recognize the right of refugees to return in safety and dignity.  They must also address the grievances of the Rohingya, whose status has been left unresolved for far too long.

No one is winning today’s wars.

From Syria to Yemen, from South Sudan to the Sahel, Afghanistan and elsewhere, only political solutions can bring peace.

We should have no illusions.  We will not be able to eradicate terrorism if we do not resolve the conflicts that are creating the disorder within which violent extremists flourish.

Last week I announced the creation of a High-Level Advisory Board on Mediation.  Those eminent individuals will allow us to be more effective in brokering peace around the world.

The United Nations is forging closer partnerships with key regional organizations such as the African Union, the European Union, the League of Arab States and the Organization of Islamic Cooperation.

We continue to strengthen and modernize peacekeeping – protecting civilians and saving lives around the world.

And since taking office, I have sought to bring together the parties to conflict, as well as those that have influence on them.

As a meaningful example, I am particularly hopeful about tomorrow’s meeting on Libya.

Last month, I visited Israel and Palestine.  We must not let today’s stagnation in the peace process lead to tomorrow’s escalation.  We must restore the hopes of the people. The two-state solution remains the only way forward.  It must be pursued urgently.

But I must be frank: in too many cases, the warring parties believe war is the answer.

They may speak of a willingness to compromise.

But their actions too often betray a thirst for outright military victory, at any cost.

Violations of international humanitarian law are rampant, and impunity prevails.

Civilians are paying the highest price, with women and girls facing systematic violence and oppression.

I have seen in my country, and in my years at the United Nations, that it is possible to move from war to peace, and from dictatorship to democracy.  Let us push ahead with a surge in diplomacy today and a leap in conflict prevention for tomorrow.

Fourth, climate change puts our hopes in jeopardy.

Last year was the hottest ever.  The past decade has been the hottest on record.

Average global temperature keeps climbing, glaciers are receding and permafrost is declining.

Millions of people and trillions of assets are at risk from rising seas and other climate disruptions.

The number of natural disasters has quadrupled since 1970.

The United States, followed by China, India, the Philippines and Indonesia, have experienced the most disasters since 1995 – more than 1,600, or once every five days.

I stand in solidarity with the people of the Caribbean and the United States who have just suffered through Hurricane Irma, the longest-lasting Category 5 storm ever recorded. And Maria is already on its way.

We should not link any single weather event with climate change.  But scientists are clear that such extreme weather is precisely what their models predict will be the new normal of a warming world.

We have had to update our language to describe what is happening: we now talk of mega-hurricanes, superstorms and rain bombs.

It is time to get off the path of suicidal emissions.  We know enough today to act.  The science is unassailable.

I urge Governments to implement the historic Paris Agreement with ever greater ambition.

I commend those cities that are setting bold targets.

I welcome the initiatives of the thousands of private enterprises – including major oil and gas companies – that are betting on a clean, green future.

Energy markets tell us that green business is good business.

The falling cost of renewables is one of the most encouraging stories on the planet today.

So is the growing evidence that economies can grow as emissions go down.

New markets, more jobs, opportunities to generate trillions in economic output.

The facts are clear.  Solutions are staring us in the face. Leadership needs to catch up.

Fifth, rising inequality is undermining the foundations of society and the social compact.

The integration of the world’s economies, expanding trade and stunning advances in technology have brought remarkable benefits.

More people have risen out of extreme poverty than ever before.  The global middle class is also bigger than ever.  More people are living longer, healthier lives.

But the gains have not been equal.  We see gaping disparities in income, opportunity and access to the fruits of research and innovation.

Eight men hold the same wealth as half of humanity.

Whole regions, countries and communities remain far removed from the waves of progress and growth, left behind in the Rust Belts of our world.

This exclusion has a price: frustration, alienation, instability.

But we have a blueprint to change course — to achieve fair globalization.

That plan is the 2030 Agenda.

Half our world is female.

Half our world is under 25 years of age.

We cannot meet the Sustainable Development Goals without drawing on the power of women and the enormous energy of young people.

We know how fast transformation can take place in our day and age.

We know that with global assets and wealth worth trillions, we are not suffering from a lack of funds.

Let us find the wisdom to use the tools, plans and resources already in our hands to achieve inclusive and sustainable development — a goal in its own right but also our best form of conflict prevention.

The dark side of innovation is the sixth threat we must confront — and it has moved from the frontier to the front door.

Technology will continue to be at the heart of shared progress.  But innovation, as essential as it is for humankind, can bring unintended consequences.

Cybersecurity threats are escalating.

Cyber war is becoming less and less a hidden reality — and more and more able to disrupt relations among States and destroy some of the structures and systems of modern life.

Advances in cyberspace can empower people, but the dark web shows that some use this capacity to degrade and enslave.

Artificial intelligence is a game changer that can boost development and transform lives in spectacular fashion.  But it may also have a dramatic impact on labour markets and, indeed, on global security and the very fabric of societies.

Genetic engineering has gone from the pages of science fiction to the marketplace – but it has generated new and unresolved ethical dilemmas.

Unless these breakthroughs are handled responsibly, they could cause incalculable damage.

Governments and international organizations are simply not prepared for these developments.

Traditional forms of regulation simply do not apply.

It is clear that such trends and capacities demand a new generation of strategic thinking, ethical reflection and regulation.

The United Nations stands ready as a forum where Member States, civil society, businesses and the academic community can come together and discuss the way forward, for the benefit of all.

Finally, I want to talk about human mobility, which I do not perceive as a threat even if some do.  I see it as a challenge that, if properly managed, can help bring the world together.

Let us be clear: we do not only face a refugee crisis; we also face a crisis of solidarity.

Every country has the right to control its own borders.  But that must be done in a way that protects the rights of people on the move.

Instead of closed doors and open hostility, we need to re-establish the integrity of the refugee protection regime and the simple decency of human compassion.  With a truly global sharing of responsibility, the number of refugees we face can be managed.

But too many states have not risen to the moment.

I commend those countries that have shown admirable hospitality to millions of forcibly displaced people.  We need to do more to support them.

We also need to do more to face the challenges of migration.  The truth is that the majority of migrants move in a well-ordered fashion, making positive contributions to their host countries and homelands.

It is when migrants move in unregulated ways that the risks become clear – risks for states but most especially risks for migrants themselves exposed to perilous journeys.

Migration has always been with us.

Climate change, demographics, instability, growing inequalities, and aspirations for a better life, as well as unmet needs in labour markets, mean it is here to stay.

The answer is effective international cooperation in managing migration to ensure that its benefits are most widely distributed, and that the human rights of all concerned are properly protected.

From my experience, I can assure you that most people prefer to realize their aspirations at home.

We must work together; development cooperation must be oriented in such a way to make sure that they can do so.

Migration should be an option, not a necessity.

We also need a much stronger commitment of the international community to crack down on human traffickers, and to protect their victims.

But let us be clear, we will not end the tragedies on the Mediterranean, the Andaman Sea and elsewhere without creating more opportunities for regular migration. This will benefit migrants and countries alike.

I myself am a migrant, as are many of you in this room. But no one expected me to risk my life on a leaky boat or to cross a desert in the back of a truck to find employment outside my country of birth.

Safe migration cannot be limited to the global elite.

Refugees, internally displaced persons and migrants are not the problem; the problem lies in conflict, persecution and hopeless poverty.

I have been pained to see the way refugees and migrants have been stereotyped and scapegoated – and to see political figures stoke resentment in search of electoral gain.

In today’s world, all societies are becoming multicultural, multiethnic and multi-religious.

This diversity must be seen as a richness, not as a threat.  But to make diversity a success, we need to invest in social cohesion, so that all people feel that their identities are respected and that they have a stake in the community as a whole.

We need to reform our world, and I am committed to reforming the United Nations.

Together, we have embarked on a comprehensive reform effort:
— to build a UN development system to support States in bettering peoples’ lives;
— to reinforce our ability to safeguard people’s peace, security and human rights;
— and to embrace management practices that advance those goals instead of hindering them.

We have launched a new victims-centered approach to preventing sexual exploitation and abuse.

We have a roadmap to achieve gender parity at the United Nations – and we are already on our way.

We are here to serve: to relieve the suffering of “we the peoples”; and to help fulfill their dreams.

We come from different corners of the world.

Our cultures, religions and traditions vary widely – and, I would say, wonderfully.

At times, there are competing interests among us.

At others, there is even open conflict.

That is exactly why we need the United Nations.

That is exactly why multilateralism is more important than ever.

We call ourselves the international community.

We must act as one, because only together, as united nations, can we fulfil the promise of the Charter and advance human dignity for all.

Thank you.  Shokran.  Xie Xie.  Merci.  Spasibo.  Gracias.  Obrigado.

HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL HOLDS INTERACTIVE DIALOGUE WITH THE FACT-FINDING MISSION ON MYANMAR

Human Rights Council HRC/17/133
MORNING 19 September 2017

HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL HOLDS INTERACTIVE DIALOGUE WITH THE FACT-FINDING MISSION ON MYANMAR

The Human Rights Council this morning held an interactive dialogue with the Independent International Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar after it had heard an oral update by Marzuki Darusman, Chairperson of the Fact-Finding Mission.

In his presentation, Mr. Darusman noted that the events in Myanmar since 2011 indicated the continued need for independent fact-finding to establish what had happened and who was responsible.  In addition to the human rights violations in Rakhine, serious allegations of human rights violations and abuses continued to emerge from Kachin and northern Shan, which would be examined by the Fact-Finding Mission.  Allegations of the same types of violations had arisen in the context of recent attacks on security posts in Rakhine state and the ensuing security operation of the Myanmar authorities – mass killings, excessive use of force, torture and ill-treatment, sexual and gender-based violence, and the burning and destruction of entire villages.  There had also been reports of landmines being planted on the border with Bangladesh that were maiming and killing those trying to escape the violence, including children.

Speaking as the concerned country, Myanmar disassociated itself from resolution 34/22, noting that instituting such a fact-finding mission was not a helpful course of action in solving the already intricate Rakhine issue.  The tension in Rakhine had been flared up on 25 August 2017 by the fatal raids by hundreds of Arakan Rohignya Salvation Army terrorists on 30 police posts.  Proportionate security measures targeted only terrorists and were being taken to safeguard State sovereignty and to restore law and order.  The Government of Myanmar was committed to a sustainable solution that would lead to peace, security and development of all communities in Rakhine state.

In the ensuing discussion, speakers condemned the latest attacks by a militant armed group on police outposts in northern Rakhine, which aimed at undermining the quest for peace and a long-term solution.  Some speakers noted that the Rohingya were the most persecuted people in the world, and that the situation could be described as ethnic cleansing.  They called on all parties to the conflict to refrain from exacerbating the situation, and called on the Government of Myanmar to cooperate with the Fact-Finding Mission and to grant it full access to the country.  Speakers asked the Mission how it would ensure that its outcome would be impartial and useful to the Government, as well as how it intended to establish the facts and circumstances of the alleged human rights violations and abuses in other parts of Myanmar.

Speaking were European Union, Poland, Germany, Russian Federation, Canada, France, Denmark, Organisation of Islamic Cooperation, Belgium, Venezuela, Netherlands, Japan,  Maldives, Finland, Thailand, Czech Republic, Australia, Iraq, Albania, Estonia, Croatia, Spain, Libya, United States, Austria, Afghanistan, China, Portugal, Costa Rica, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, United Kingdom, Luxembourg, India, Turkey, Bangladesh, Republic of Korea, Ireland, Mexico, Indonesia, Algeria, Iran, Saudi Arabia, New Zealand, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, United Arab Emirates, Viet Nam, Azerbaijan and Iceland.

Also taking the floor were the following non-governmental organizations: Christian Solidarity Worldwide, Lutheran World Federation (in a joint statement with several NGOs), Amnesty International, Minority Rights Group, Human Rights Watch, Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development Forum-Asia, Lawyers’ Rights Watch Canada (in a joint statement with International Bar Association) and International Federation for Human Rights Leagues.

The Council will next hear a presentation of the report by the Commission of Inquiry on Burundi, to be followed by an interactive dialogue.  In the afternoon, the Council will hold a general debate on human rights situations that require the Council’s attention.

Opening Statement by the President of the Council

JOAQUIN ALEXANDER MAZA MARTELLI, President of the Human Rights Council, opened the interactive dialogue by informing that the Human Rights Council, following serious further deterioration of the security, human rights and humanitarian situation in Rakhine state in Myanmar, had adopted resolution 34/22, establishing an Independent International Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar with a mandate to establish the facts and circumstances of alleged recent human rights violations by military and security forces and abuses.  He thereby invited Mr. Marzuki Darusman, Chairperson of the Independent International Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar, to present the report of the Mission.

Statement by the Chairperson of the Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar

MARZUKI DARUSMAN, Chairperson of the Independent International Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar, established by Human Rights Council resolution 34/22, said events in Myanmar since 2011 indicated the continuing need for independent fact-finding to establish what had happened and who was responsible.  The Mission was mindful of the complexity of the situation and disturbed by the gravity of the allegations. The Mission’s mandate covered the entire country, in particular but not exclusively Rakhine state.  The Mission was seized of the situation in other parts of the country, particularly where there had been armed clashes.  In that regard, serious allegations of human rights violations and abuses continued to emerge from Kachin and northern Shan, which would be examined by the Fact-Finding Mission.  The Mission focused on the period since 2011, the year of the breakdown of a ceasefire in northern Myanmar, and the heightening of tensions that led to large-scale violence in northern Rakhine in 2012.  The Human Rights Council resolution had set out a list of alleged violations that should be included in the fact-finding.

Allegations of the same types of violations had arisen in the context of recent attacks on security posts in Rakhine state and the ensuing security operation of the Myanmar authorities – mass killings, excessive use of force, torture and ill-treatment, sexual and gender-based violence, and the burning and destruction of entire villages.  There had been reports of landmines being planted on the border with Bangladesh that were maiming and killing those trying to escape the violence, including children.  There had also been reports of dehumanizing propaganda that likened the Rohingya to pests.  The Human Rights Council would recognize the danger signs, having seen the world over how hate speech preceded and accompanied major atrocities.  The Mission was alarmed by these reports and would examine them carefully.  Putting aside eventual findings on the human rights allegations, it was clear to the Mission that there was a grave humanitarian crisis under way which required urgent attention.  Over 400,000 people had sought refuge in Bangladesh in less than a month.  There were reports that nearly 200 Rohingya villages in the affected areas had been emptied.

It was important for the Mission to see with its own eyes the sites of these alleged violations and abuses and to speak directly with the affected people and with the authorities.  For that reason, the Mission had communicated with the Government of Myanmar, requesting cooperation with the Mission and full and unfettered access to the country.  The Mission was hopeful that its request would be met positively, especially as it was aware of the Government’s expressed concern for truth.  The Mission firmly believed that it was in the Government’s interest and in the interest of the people of Myanmar to communicate their views and evidence directly to the Fact-Finding Mission.  Mr. Darusman reiterated the Mission’s request to the Government of Myanmar for cooperation, most importantly by granting the Mission access to the country.   He stressed that the Mission was approaching the human rights situation in Myanmar without any preconceived ideas and would base its findings on a solid, objective assessment of the information verified.  The Mission was open to all sources of information, which it had already received in large volumes.  He invited others who wished to submit information to do so – this including the Government of Myanmar.

Finally, Mr. Darusam respectfully appealed to the Human Rights Council to consider extending the mandate of the Fact-Finding Mission by six months to September 2018, with the resources that would allow them to carry on their work at full speed.

Statement by the Concerned Country

Myanmar, speaking as the concerned country, disassociated itself from resolution 34/22.  The Government continued to believe that instituting such a mission was not a helpful course of action in solving the already intricate Rakhine issue.  The tension in Rakhine had been flared up on 25 August 2017 by the fatal raids by hundreds of Arakan Rohignya Salvation Army terrorists on 30 police posts.  Nothing justified terrorism.  Proportionate security measures targeted only terrorists and were being taken to safeguard State sovereignty and to restore law and order.  As the result of the terrorist attacks, people from Muslim, Hindu and Buddhist communities, as well as from ethnic minorities Mro, Daignet and Kaman, had been killed and displaced.  The Government of Myanmar was committed to a sustainable solution that would lead to peace, security and development of all communities in Rakhine state.  It believed that the recommendations made by the Advisory Commission led by the former United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan was a practical blueprint for the implementation leading to a sustainable solution.

Interactive Dialogue

European Union called on the Government of Myanmar to cooperate with the Fact-Finding Mission, and stressed the need for it to be granted full access.  The Mission was asked how it would ensure that its outcome would be impartial and useful to the Government, as well as how it intended to establish the facts and circumstances of the alleged human rights violations and abuses in other parts of “Myanmar/Burma”.  Poland shared concern over the dire situation of Myanmar nationals, who were refugees in Bangladesh.  Mr. Darusman was asked to elaborate on the situation of other ethnic and religious minorities in Myanmar, including the Christian minority.  Germany expressed deep worry about the human rights situation in Myanmar, and called on the country to end the military campaign against the civilian population, to adequately protect those who suffered from violence and abuses, and to bring to justice those responsible for recent atrocities.  Mr. Darusman was asked how the international community could support the Fact-Finding Mission in its crucial efforts to assess the conflict.

Russian Federation shared the concerns expressed regarding the worsening situation in Rakhine state, and condemned terrorist groupings, calling on all parties to the conflict to refrain from the exacerbation of the situation.  Russian Federation supported efforts to establish an inter-confessional dialogue in Myanmar.  Canada wanted Myanmar’s democratically elected Government to succeed and to build an inclusive, diverse and stable society, but to do so, the violence in Rakhine state had to end.  The Fact-Finding Mission was asked how, despite their lack of in-country access, they had pursued their work to ensure it was comprehensive.  France said the vigilance of the international community was necessary, noting that the High Commissioner for Human Rights had warned against elements which constituted ethnic cleansing.  Mr. Darusman was asked how he planned to fulfil his mandate to guarantee an independent inquiry into the violations which had been committed in Arakan.

Denmark strongly condemned the latest attacks by a militant armed group on police outposts in northern Rakhine, which aimed at undermining the quest for peace and a long-term solution.  It was deeply concerned about the report of violence against civilians and called on all parties to exercise restraint to avoid an escalation of violence.  Organization of Islamic Cooperation said unfortunately, since the establishment of the Fact-Finding Mission, the situation in Myanmar had worsened and reached catastrophic dimensions.  The Rohingya were the most persecuted people in the world, and the situation could be described as ethnic cleansing.  Belgium commended Myanmar for the complex transition towards democracy since 2011, however it was highly alarmed by the latest reports of excessive violence by security forces and the rapidly deteriorating humanitarian situation in Rakhine, with over 400,000 people fleeing the state.  It called upon the Government to grant full access to the Fact-Finding Mission.

Venezuela said the intentions of the Government of Myanmar had to be trusted.  Only with constructive dialogue with the concerned State could a solution be found – the opposite of this was politicization, which had to be avoided at the Human Rights Council.  Netherlands was very concerned by the large-scale violence committed against the Rohingya minority in Rakhine state.  It was paramount that the perpetrators were held to account.  The only way to build a sustainable future was through transparency, justice and reconciliation.  Japan condemned the attacks carried out against Myanmar’s civilian population and security forces in northern areas of Rakhine state since August 25.  While the Myanmar Government Investigation Commission Summary Report for Maungdaw in Rakhine State acknowledged that human rights violations took place, it indicated that investigations would continue due to insufficient evidence to convict suspects.  How would the Commission clarify the facts of the situation in northern Rakhine state?

Remarks by the Chairperson of the Independent International Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar

MARZUKI DARUSMAN, Chairperson of the Independent International Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar, said that many of the important questions posed by delegations might have to be postponed due to the fact that the Fact-Finding Mission had only started its work.  The queries would have to be matched by the necessary research.  The Mission had to first gain access to the country and that was the main issue that it had to address.  The Mission continued to hope that the question would be resolved, and it took note of the readiness of the Myanmar Government to approve the mandate of the Mission.  Mr. Darusman welcomed the recent speech of State Counsellor Aung Sung which confirmed the Government’s readiness to welcome back the refugees and to allow global scrutiny.  Those two facts were very constructive.  As for the international community’s assistance to the Mission, Mr. Darusman explained that the Mission’s mandate was a very complex one and it thus went beyond identifying a single root cause of the crisis.  It would be helpful if any views and judgements were not based on assumptions, but on the conclusions of the Fact-Finding Mission.  The volume of work and the complexity of the situation suggested that it would useful to ascertain a definite period of the Mission’s mandate in order to produce an objective report.

Interactive Dialogue

Maldives expressed concern about the horrific reports of innocent civilians being killed during security operations in Myanmar’s Rakhine state.  Maldives joined the international community in calling on the Myanmar Government to cease all atrocities against the Muslim Rohingya population and respect its obligations under international law, international humanitarian law and human rights covenants.  Finland said it had followed with growing concern the escalation of violence during the last year in Myanmar, including against the Rohingya minority.  Mr. Darusman was asked how the Fact-Finding Mission was taking into account gender-specific protection concerns and measures to address them.  Thailand said that as a close neighbour and fellow member of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, Thailand had pledged additional immediate aid to those affected both in Myanmar and Bangladesh.  Thailand encouraged the international community and the Fact-Finding Mission to provide technical assistance to enable sustaining peace and development in Myanmar.

Czech Republic said that as a long-term supporter of the transition process in Myanmar, Czech Republic was concerned about the recent developments in the country, as mentioned by the High Commissioner for Human Rights at the opening of the Human Rights Council’s session.  The promotion and protection of human rights was a demanding and never-ending mission that every State needed to undertake.  Australia said that with many facts in dispute, independent assessment was warranted, adding that the excessive use of force was not legitimised.  It was vital that Myanmar allowed unfettered access for international humanitarian agencies as soon as possible.  Iraq condemned the systematic genocide campaign suffered by the Rohingya minority.  Large-scale crimes required a systematic response; the Human Rights Council was called on to step up to its responsibility by ending the crimes against that minority.

Albania welcomed the work of the Fact-Finding Mission and reiterated its strong support for its mandate.  It was increasingly and deeply concerned about the developments in Rakhine state in Myanmar, particularly with the massive and very grave human rights violations and abuses faced by the Rohingya minority since August 2017.  Estonia said violations suffered by the Rohingya community, including extrajudicial killings, forced displacements, and widespread burning of Rohingya villages, had led to the internal displacement or migration of the Rohingya population.  It called upon Myanmar to take urgent and meaningful steps to implement the recommendations of the Advisory Commission led by former United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan.  Croatia said it was closely monitoring the situation in Myanmar and expressed its grave concern for the recent escalation of violence in Rakhine state.  Admittedly, the conflict in Rakhine state had a long history, and would be difficult for any government to deal with.  However it was the duty of every government to protect its civilians, including ethnic and religious minorities.

Spain was deeply concerned about the situation in Rakhine state, including arbitrary detention, torture, rape and other forms of sexual violence, forced disappearance, illegal destruction of property, and other grave violations of human rights.  Conversely, it was pleased to see that Myanmar had achieved progress in the amendment of its legal framework and called upon the Government to ensure the independence of the judiciary.  Libya strongly condemned the barbaric killings to which Rohingya Muslims were exposed. This was a humanitarian crisis caused by a wave of ethnic extremism which the Government had not taken any steps to put a stop to.  Libya called on the Human Rights Council to ensure that the Government put in place a permanent solution that would end the suffering and the crimes against humanity.  United States hoped the Government would utilize the expert findings of the Fact-Finding Mission to hold accountable the violators.  It deeply regretted the violations committed by the armed forces against the population.  While condemning the August 25 attack on the authorities, it demanded that the authorities respond to these attacks in a manner that protected and respected human rights.

Austria condemned the attacks on police posts by Rohingya militants on 25 August 2017, but strongly believed that the reported security operation in reaction to those attacks was excessive, disproportionate and without regard for the basic principles of international law.   Afghanistan voiced deep concern about the systematic violation of human rights in Myanmar, particularly the abuses of Rohingya Muslims.  It called upon the Government to protect the human rights of Rohingya Muslims and other minority groups, and to hold perpetrators responsible.  China condemned the recent violent attacks in Myanmar, voicing hope that stability would be restored.  The international community should remain patient as a solution for the crisis was being searched for, and support Myanmar’s efforts to achieve development.

Portugal welcomed the recommendations of the Advisory Commission on Rakhine state created by the Government of Myanmar and chaired by Kofi Annan, but noted that the Commission had not been mandated to investigate specific alleged human rights violations, but to address institutional and structural issues which undermined peace, justice and development in Rakhine.  Costa Rica called on the Government of Myanmar to stop the systematic institutional discrimination against minorities, especially of the Rohingya.  It urged the Government to respect international law and human rights, whereas the Council had to promptly deal with the humanitarian crisis in Myanmar.  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea opposed country-specific mandates because they infringed on the internal sovereignty of the targeted country.  Certain reports on Myanmar failed to correctly reflect the situation on the ground.  The Council should refrain from naming and shaming.

United Kingdom said that while the international community’s focus was drawn to Rakhine, the on-going conflict in Kachin state and Shan state should not be forgotten.  Mr. Darusman was asked how the Fact-Finding Mission intended to give equitable coverage to the full range of issues in his mandate.  Luxembourg urged the Government of Myanmar to allow unrestricted access to the Fact-Finding Mission, and expressed concern about recent events in Rakhine.  The root causes of the conflict needed to be understood and combatted.  India expressed deep concern at the situation in Myanmar, noting that many had sought refuge in neighbouring Bangladesh.  The situation in Rakhine should be handled with restraint, focusing on the welfare of the civilian population.

Turkey said the current situation in Myanmar was a humanitarian tragedy and should not be a concern only for Turkey or for Muslim countries, but should be important to the international community as a whole.  Problems in Rakhine state might have implications for regional security as indicated in the final report of the Rakhine Advisory Commission, which was a balanced report.  Bangladesh said the international community needed to look into the real causes of forcibly displacing en masse half a million people into a neighbouring country.  The international community had a moral responsibility to act without delay.  Republic of Korea expressed concern over the current massive refugee crisis in Rakhine state and its neighbouring region.  Mr. Darusman was asked for his input on how he would build a bridge of mutual trust and cooperation suggested by the former United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan.

Ireland condemned the attacks of 25 August 2017 by militants and the subsequent violence that had taken place in Rakhine state in Myanmar.  There was an urgent need for a de-escalation of tensions and for the full observance of international human rights law.  Mexico was greatly concerned about human rights violations seen in Rakhine state in Myanmar, and called on all parties to protect civilians and to allow humanitarian access to the most vulnerable groups.  It urged the Government to protect the rights of all of its population, regardless of ethnicity and religion.  Indonesia voiced deep concern about the humanitarian situation in Rakhine state and the flow of refugees that still continued.  It called on the Government of Myanmar to restore stability and security in Rakhine state, and to exercise restraint and refrain from violence.

Algeria deplored the continued violence and human rights abuses of the Rohingya minority in Myanmar.  It called on the Government to fulfil all its obligations towards all its citizens, including those of Muslim faith.  Iran shared concern about the indiscriminate attacks against Muslims in Myanmar.  If left unattended, the violations of the basic rights of the Rohingya Muslims would encourage extremism and destabilise the whole region.

Saudi Arabia condemned what appeared to be systemic ethnic cleansing against the Rohingya in Myanmar and regretted the lack of access to the areas affected that would allow international organizations to do their work.  Myanmar must be called to account for its apparent violations of human rights.  New Zealand strongly condemned the violence in Rakhine state and welcomed the Advisory Commission’s report.  It also stood ready to support the Myanmar Government in enacting the recommendations in the report and underlined that security operations in Rakhine should be proportionate.  Lao Democratic Peoples’ Republic supported the Government of Myanmar’s reform programme and said that international condemnation was not conducive to sorting out the situation on the ground.  It urged the international community to continue to support the Government in its efforts to resolve the crisis.

United Arab Emirates expressed its deep concern over the deteriorating situation with respect to the Rohingya refugees and the growing repression to which they were subject.  The flow of refugees must be slowed with active involvement and the United Arab Emirates had supplied aid to this end.  Viet Nam thanked the Fact-Finding Mission for its report and encouraged Myanmar to find sustainable solutions in its efforts to promote human rights.  As an ASEAN Member State, Viet Nam stood ready and prepared to continue its close cooperation with Myanmar in its reconstruction process.  Azerbaijan was seriously concerned about the plight of the Rohingya population and noted that this was not a new phenomenon.  There was an urgent need to de-escalate the crisis.  Azerbaijan stood by the Bangladeshi authorities dealing with the refugees that had fled over its border.  Iceland said that during the Human Rights Council session in March this year, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights had addressed the rapidly deteriorating situation in Myanmar, stating that it was a textbook example of ethnic cleansing.  This situation could not go on.  Iceland called on the Human Rights Council to establish a robust mechanism to investigate the situation on the ground.

Christian Solidarity Worldwide remained deeply concerned with the situation in Myanmar, and in particular with the situation in Rakhine state.  As the Human Rights Commissioner had said, it was a textbook example of ethnic cleansing.  The army had intensified assault on the Shia and Christian populations, which had caused the displacement of thousands of persons.  Lutheran World Federation, in a joint statement with several NGOs1, strongly condemned the violence in Rakhine state, and expressed sympathies for all those who had lost close ones.  The Federation urged the stop of the spread of misinformation that endangered the lives of humanitarian workers.  Amnesty International deplored the coordinated attacks and disproportionate violence against the Rohingya community.  This was ethnic cleansing and amounted to crimes against humanity.  It was important to remember that the Myanmar military was also perpetrating attacks in other parts of the country.

Minority Rights Group was increasingly alarmed at the situation in Rakhine which followed a pattern similar to the situation in 2012 and again in 2016.  Given that this was a recurring tactic by security forces it was clear that it was an attempt to expulse the Rohingya from Myanmar.  This, in turn, could amount to crimes against humanity and genocide.  Human Rights Watch said the situation demonstrated the need of the work of the Fact-Finding Mission.  If a State engaged in ethnic cleansing, it had every reason to hide what was going on.  However there were thousands of witnesses, and the truth would come out.

Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development Forum-Asia said the recent escalation in Rakhine state was unprecedented, noting that three United Nations Special Rapporteurs had expressed concern about the situation.  What had taken place seemed to be a textbook case of ethnic cleansing, and the Human Rights Council should pass a resolution and call for an immediate end to attacks, among other measures.  Lawyers’ Rights Watch Canada, in a joint statement with International Bar Association, said that when the Human Rights Council had created the Fact-Finding Mission, the Government of Myanmar had responded first by denying it access, and then by stepping up attacks.  There was a pattern of denying human rights defenders access, and the Human Rights Council should call on all States to urge the Government of Myanmar to allow access for all necessary humanitarian aid.  International Federation for Human Rights Leagues condemned the ongoing attacks against unarmed Rohingya civilians by Myanmar security forces; if current trends held, nearly the entire Rohingya population will have fled the country by the end of the year.  The Human Rights Council should adopt a resolution calling on the Myanmar Government to stop using government media to incite hatred against the Rohingya.

Concluding Remarks

MARZUKI DARUSMAN, Chairperson of the Independent International Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar, said the Fact-Finding Mission could not be removed from the ongoing situation that was unfolding in Myanmar.  The Fact-Finding Mission had been able to field an advance team, and was becoming immersed in the situation on the ground.  Attention on Myanmar was necessary until a determination could be made on what was happening in the country.  Some issues that had been expressed by the Council had been noted, such as gender-specific concerns.  The Fact-Finding Mission was aided by the Government requesting an Advisory Commission on the future of Rakhine state, led by former United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan.  The report started by stating that Rakhine state was going through a developmental crisis, a human rights crisis, and a security crisis at the same time.  Those observations set the tone of Mr. Annan’s report.  The Fact-Finding Mission was looking ahead towards producing a report which would be complementary to that report, as the Annan report was not mandated to look into specific human rights violations.  The Fact-Finding Mission would be undertaking a more specific mandate in that regard.  Lack of access would not be an insurmountable handicap, as a solid report would be produced regardless.  He reiterated his appeal for an extension of the Fact-Finding Mission’s mandate.  Current developments in other parts of the country were also of concern, such as Kachin and Shan states.  The Fact-Finding Mission would go where the evidence led it.  He appealed to the Government of Myanmar to allow the Fact-Finding Mission access into the country, as that was the only way the Government would be able to present its view on what was happening there.

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1Joint statement: Lutheran World Federation; Action contre la faim; Care International; International Rescue Committee; Norwegian Refugee Council; Save the Children International.

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For use of the information media; not an official record

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Statement by Anthony Lake, UNICEF Executive Director, on children affected by the violence in Rakhine, Myanmar

NEW YORK, 5 September 2017 – “More than 125,000 Rohingya refugees have fled across the border from Rakhine State, Myanmar, into Bangladesh since 25 August, as many as 80 per cent of them are women and children. Many more children in need of support and protection remain in the areas of northern Rakhine State that have been wracked by violence.

“In Bangladesh, UNICEF is scaling up its response to provide refugee children with protection, nutrition, health, water and sanitation support.

“In Myanmar, UNICEF does not at present have access to the affected areas in northern Rakhine State. We are unable to reach the 28,000 children to whom we were previously providing psychosocial care or the more than 4,000 children who were treated for malnutrition in Buthidaung and Maungdaw. Our clean water and sanitation work has been suspended, as have school repairs that were under way.

“Children on both sides of the border need urgent help and protection.”

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Notes for editors:

 

About UNICEF

UNICEF works in some of the world’s toughest places, to reach the world’s most disadvantaged children. Across 190 countries and territories, we work for every child, everywhere, to build a better world for everyone.

 

For further information, please contact:

 

Najwa Mekki, UNICEF New York, +1917 209 1804, nmekki@unicef.org

Christopher de Bono, UNICEF Regional Office in Bangkok, +66 86 371 7012, cdebono@unicef.org

Simon Ingram, UNICEF Brussels, +32 491 90 5118, singram@unicef.org

Christophe Boulierac, UNICEF Geneva, +41 79 963 9244, cboulierac@unicef.org